[SeMissourian.com] Fair ~ 88°F  
River stage: 29.11 ft. Falling
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
History stories

Agency's move in St. Louis leaves history behind (07/22/14)
ST. LOUIS -- In the front parlor of a century-old mansion south of downtown sits a scale model of Osama bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The model was used to brief U.S. generals before military forces raided the compound and killed the terrorist mastermind...
Movie, TV legend James Garner dies (07/21/14)
LOS ANGELES -- Actor James Garner, whose whimsical style in the 1950s TV Western "Maverick" led to a stellar career in TV and films such as "The Rockford Files" and his Oscar-nominated "Murphy's Romance," has died, police said. He was 86. He was found dead of natural causes at his home in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles on Saturday evening, Los Angeles police officer Alonzo Iniquez said early Sunday...
Brash stage legend Elaine Stritch dies at 89 (07/18/14)
NEW YORK -- Elaine Stritch, the brash theater performer whose gravelly, gin-laced voice and impeccable comic timing made her a Broadway legend, has died. She was 89. Joseph Rosenthal, Stritch's longtime attorney, said the actress died Thursday of natural causes at her home in Birmingham, Michigan...
17th-century shipwreck on the move in Texas (07/18/14)
BRYAN, Texas -- The recovered remains of a ship belonging to the famed French explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier Sieur de la Salle, which sank off the Texas coast more than three centuries ago, were launched on their final journey Thursday. The keel and other large structural pieces of La Belle, which have been preserved in a gigantic freeze-dryer at Texas A&M since 2012, were gingerly loaded onto a flatbed truck for the 85-mile trip to the Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, the last stop in a voyage that began in 1685 with La Salle's ill-fated expedition to find the mouth of the Mississippi River.. ...
Aldrin asks for moon walk memories (07/17/14)
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On July 20, 1969, Buzz Aldrin was "out of town" when the world united and rejoiced in a way never seen before or since. He and Neil Armstrong were on the moon. They missed the whole celebration 45 years ago Sunday. So did Michael Collins, orbiting solo around the moon in the mother ship...
Author to discuss new book on Elizabeth Seton (07/13/14)
An author and her new book will be appearing on Wednesday in Perryville, Missouri.
1956 Grand Canyon crash game-changer in air travel (07/09/14)
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- In the mid-1950s, air travel was a shadow of the highly advanced operation of checks and rules seen today. The skies were largely uncontrolled, and pilots outside major U.S. cities relied on sight to avoid catastrophes. Then, two commercial airplanes crashed over the Grand Canyon in June 1956, killing all 128 people aboard in the deadliest aviation disaster of the time and helping spur an overhaul to flight safety. ...
US survivors of WWII battle recall Saipan attack (07/08/14)
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. (AP) -- Even after seven decades, Wilfred "Spike" Mailloux won't talk about surviving a bloody World War II battle unless longtime friend John Sidur is by his side. It was Sidur who found the severely wounded Mailloux hours after both survived Japan's largest mass suicide attack in the Pacific. ...
Shevardnadze, ex-Georgian president, dies at 86 (07/08/14)
TBILISI, Georgia -- Eduard Shevardnadze was a key figure in revolutions abroad and the victim of one at home. As the Soviet Union's foreign minister, he helped topple the Berlin Wall and end the Cold War, but as the leader of post-Soviet Georgia his career in the public eye ended in humiliation when he was chased out of his parliament and forced into retirement...
Downtown building falls apart Thursday (07/06/14)
The front of the building at 633 Good Hope St. collapsed just after 1 P.M. Thursday as workers were repairing the brick exterior. The property was unoccupied, but the police and fire departments evacuated several occupants of the adjacent buildings and cordoned off the road between South Sprigg and South Frederick streets...
'Someone got away with murder': Six decades later, identity of Bonnie Huffman's killer remains unknown (07/03/14)
The note -- written on torn, now-yellowed paper in a traditional, slightly shaky cursive -- arrived in a postage-paid business reply envelope marked, "Please give to man who wrote articles on Huffman case." It implored a reporter to visit its author at her home north of Benton, Missouri, "and please keep plans quiet."...
War hero, Olympian Zamperini dies at 97 (07/03/14)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Louis Zamperini, an Olympic distance runner and World War II veteran who survived 47 days on a raft in the Pacific after his bomber crashed, then endured two years in Japanese prison camps, has died. He was 97. Zamperini's death was confirmed by Universal Pictures studio spokesman Michael Moses. A family statement released early Thursday said Zamperini had been suffering from pneumonia...
The Fourth and the founding of Jackson (07/01/14)
Happy Independence Day! As we celebrate the occasion, take a moment to remember our forefathers who sacrificed so much to make us an independent nation some 238 years ago. Also remember those people who through the years have made sacrifices to keep us free...
Historic preservation expert has roots in Southeast Missouri (06/30/14)
For having the right to boast about her part in the transformation of the A.C. Vasterling building, a previously abandoned and foreclosed structure built in 1903 on the corner of Broadway and Fountain Street in Cape Girardeau, architect Rebecca Ward is humble and not a fan of the attention...
Ste. Genevieve entrepreneurs make careers out of creativity (06/27/14)
STE. GENEVIEVE, Mo. -- Sam Conlon is battling an addiction. OK, "battling" might be a generous description. "Perpetuating" might be a more accurate word to describe what she's doing as she and her friend Shannon McBride ease a display rack across the hardwood floor of the third historic building Conlon has bought since she came to this town about 60 miles north of Cape Girardeau 13 years ago...
History buffs race to preserve dialect in Missouri (06/27/14)
OLD MINES, Mo. (AP) -- A small circle of history researchers is racing to capture the last remnants of a little-known French dialect that endures in some old Missouri mining towns before the few remaining native speakers succumb to old age. So-called Missouri French is spoken by fewer than 30 people in Old Mines, southwest of St. Louis, although dozens of others can still rattle off phrases from childhood songs or overheard conversations involving their parents and grandparents...
Jackson readies for 2-day bicentennial bash (06/27/14)
The centerpiece of Jackson's yearlong bicentennial celebration will take place July 4 and 5, with activities ranging from pageants and parades to races for people and rubber ducks -- and helicopter rides and fun in the mud. Jackson's Independence Day celebrations are known to be fun, and this year's two-day event promises even more events and activities. ...
Veteran actor Eli Wallach dies at 98 (06/26/14)
NEW YORK -- As a masterful character actor and early product of postwar, Method-style theater, Eli Wallach wore countless faces, disappearing into them all. But he was always propelled -- in acting and in life -- by a mischievousness and an abiding playfulness that made him a tireless performer, an enduring family man and, of course, one immortal scoundrel...
Extinct pigeon subject of new Smithsonian exhibit (06/19/14)
WASHINGTON -- It was the moment that humanity learned we had the awesome power to erase an entire species off the face of the Earth in the scientific equivalent of a blink of an eye: The passenger pigeon went from billions of birds to extinct before our very eyes...
Mother Jones monument to be restored (06/19/14)
ST. LOUIS -- Union workers are chipping in to give a makeover to a monument for firebrand labor activist Mother Jones, more than 80 years after their predecessors and school kids scrimped pennies during the Great Depression to build the towering structure at her Illinois grave site...
Picasso painting reveals hidden man under surface (06/18/14)
WASHINGTON -- For artist Pablo Picasso, 1901 was a pivotal time to experiment and find his unique style. At 19, he was living in Paris, painting furiously and dirt poor, so it wasn't unusual for him to take one canvas and reuse it to paint a fresh idea...
Padre great, MLB Hall of Famer Gwynn dies at 54 (06/17/14)
He died from oral cancer he attributed to chewing tobacco use
Vietnam memorial to pass through Southern Illinois in September (06/17/14)
A traveling Vietnam memorial wall that last made an appearance in Cape Girardeau decades ago will visit the region once more in September. The American Veterans Traveling Tribute Vietnam Wall will be in Carbondale, Illinois, Sept. 11 through 14 at the practice football field on the Southern Illinois University campus, in conjunction with Southeast Missouri State University and other entities...
Casey Kasem, king of the Top 40 countdown, dead at 82 (06/16/14)
LOS ANGELES -- Casey Kasem, the internationally famous radio host with the cheerful manner and gentle voice who became the king of the Top 40 countdown with a syndicated show that ran for decades, has died. He was 82. Danny Deraney, publicist for Kasem's daughter, Kerri, said Kasem died Sunday morning. A statement issued by the family says he died at 3:23 a.m. surrounded by family and friends at a Washington state hospital...
State of Missouri office to vacate Marquette Tower (06/15/14)
The State of Missouri will be leaving the Marquette Tower in downtown Cape Girardeau, according to a news release from the building's ownership group. The move was rumored to occur after the state Department of Mental Health announced in early June that it would be moving to another location...
'Freedom Summer' changed South 50 years ago (06/15/14)
HOLLY SPRINGS, Miss. -- As a teenager growing up in a Jim Crow society, Roy DeBerry wasn't waiting for white folks to come down to Mississippi and "save" him. But in the summer of 1964, the factory worker's son was glad to see people like Aviva Futorian...
Church tour part of Jackson bicentennial fete (06/15/14)
As with farmers tilling fields and riverboats steaming their way down the Mississippi River, 19th Century Southeast Missouri was characterized by the ringing of church bells to welcome parishioners to Sunday morning services...
Actress, activist Ruby Dee's legacy recalled by fans (06/13/14)
NEW YORK -- For Ruby Dee, acting and activism were not contradictory things. They were inseparable and they were intertwined. The African-American actress who earned lead roles in movies and on Broadway also spent her entire life fighting against injustice, even emceeing the 1963 March on Washington and protesting apartheid in South Africa...
Federal funding helps keep 50-year-old floodwall whole (06/12/14)
Today is the 50th anniversary of the closing of the final gap in the Cape Girardeau floodwall. Adorned with a mural honoring notable residents of the city and state, the concrete structure serves as a tourist attraction as well as the city's protector from Mississippi River floodwaters...
Oil boom produces jobs bonanza for archaeologists (06/12/14)
TIOGA, N.D. -- Drilling crews are eager to plunge their equipment into the ground. Road builders are ready to start highway projects, and construction workers need to dig. But across the hyperactive oil fields of North Dakota, these and other groups have to wait for another team of specialists known for slow, meticulous study: archaeologists...
Missouri temple gets reprieve from wrecking ball (06/10/14)
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Preservationists have won a one-month reprieve for moving an 80-year-old rock-walled temple in Springfield that is slated for demolition. The preservationists are working to raise money to move the Timmons Temple building in Springfield because of its historical significance for the city's black community. ...
Philanthropy's makeover nearly complete (06/10/14)
For the past six weeks, Philanthropy Fashion owner Bridgett Kielhofner has worried that people entering her Cape Girardeau store would get pelted with fallen stucco the minute they stepped inside. The A.C. Vasterling building, home to Philanthropy, is being restored to its original facade to qualify for a historic tax credit...
St. Louis police to auction gangland-era weapons (06/09/14)
ST. LOUIS -- Thompson submachine guns are as much a legend as the bad -- and good -- guys who fired them. With as many colorful nicknames as the gangsters whose rat-a-tat-tats roared through the 1920s, the weapon remains an icon of American criminal, military and pop culture history...
Mo. man last survivor of military family (06/09/14)
BISMARCK, Mo. -- Don King of the Southeast Missouri town of Bismarck is the last survivor of a family of war heroes. King's father, Thomas King, served in World War I in Europe as a muleskinner in the quartermaster corps. He and his wife, Rosa, settled in Minimum, Missouri, and raised seven sons...
Historians seek missing Missouri gas chamber keys (06/09/14)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- During a private tour not long after the Missouri State Penitentiary closed its doors a decade ago, the original keys to the prison's gas chamber mysteriously disappeared. Prison historians hope that by taking their search for the keys public -- along with details about why they are important -- someone will come forward with them...
State agencies' move from Marquette could violate executive order (06/09/14)
More than a decade ago, the Marquette Tower sat at the corner of Broadway and Fountain Street in downtown Cape Girardeau, crumbling and empty -- an eyesore on the verge of being demolished. The historic hotel was essentially saved by an executive order from then-Missouri Gov. ...
Simpson case at 20: Views in black and white (06/08/14)
The O.J. Simpson murder trial exposed many painful truths. None hit harder than the idea that white and black people often look at the same facts and see different realities. Today, 20 years after the case divided the nation, few opinions have changed. Despite two decades' worth of increasing racial acceptance, the saga still reflects deep-rooted obstacles to a truly united America...
Victim's family helped jail O.J., but not for murder (06/08/14)
LOS ANGELES -- For years, Fred Goldman was adamant he would never rest until he had held O.J. Simpson accountable for the killings of his son and Simpson's ex-wife 20 years ago -- even if a jury had acquitted the former football star. After the trial, Goldman joined with the family of Simpson's ex-wife in winning a $33.5 million wrongful death judgment in civil court. ...
Poet Maya Angelou remembered at memorial service (06/08/14)
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- Maya Angelou liked to say that people will forget what you said or did in your life, but they will never forget how you made them feel. Former President Bill Clinton, first lady Michelle Obama and Oprah Winfrey said Saturday they were among the millions touched by Angelou's wisdom when they needed help to rise...
World honors D-Day's fallen (06/08/14)
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France -- It was a day of pride, remembrance and honors for those who waded through blood-tinged waves, climbed razor-sharp cliffs or fell from the skies, staring down death or dying in an invasion that portended the fall of the Third Reich and the end of World War II...
Ranking D-Day survivor recalls day of invasion (06/06/14)
The commanders at the Royal Air Force base in Andover, in the south of England, gathered for a briefing on the evening of June 5, 1944. They heard the plan: At first light the next day, troops would land on the beaches at Normandy.
Living Memories: Veterans remember D-Day invasion (06/06/14)
After joining the U.S. Navy in 1943, Tom Elfrink was a radio man on the ship LST 281 when he found himself in the thick of the historic D-Day invasion. His ship towed landing craft to Utah Beach, one of the offensive's major landing places on June 6, 1944...
Veterans, visitors flock to Normandy to mark 70th anniversary of D-Day (06/06/14)
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France -- Ceremonies to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day are drawing thousands of visitors to the cemeteries, beaches and stone-walled villages of Normandy this week, including some of the few remaining survivors of the largest seaborne invasion ever mounted...
Security tight on Tiananmen Square anniversary (06/05/14)
BEIJING -- Yin Min held the ashes of her son and wept, she said, as she marked 25 years since he was killed in the crackdown by Chinese tanks and troops on protests at Tiananmen Square. Outside, guards kept a close eye on her home while police blanketed central Beijing to block any public commemoration of one of the darkest chapters in recent Chinese history...
Last of original group of Navajo Code Talkers dies (06/05/14)
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- The language he once was punished for speaking in school became Chester Nez's primary weapon in World War II. Before hundreds of men from the Navajo Nation became Code Talkers, Nez and 28 others were recruited to develop a code based on the then-unwritten Navajo language. Locked in a room for 13 weeks, they came up with an initial glossary of more than 200 terms using Navajo words for red soil, war chief, braided hair and hummingbird, for example, and an alphabet...
More tenants move from Marquette Tower on Broadway (06/02/14)
What was big news about a decade ago has become another almost-empty building on Broadway in downtown Cape Girardeau. The Marquette Tower at 338 Broadway still sits in its restored glory, but fewer and fewer tenants are calling its offices home. The Spanish-style hotel opened in 1928 and consists of two properties: Marquette Tower, the 59,000-square-foot former hotel along Broadway, and the 25,000-square-foot Marquette Centre at 221 N. Fountain St...
All in the family: Whitaker's Hardware has been a family business since 1905 (06/02/14)
You might say Ron Whitaker has the hardware store business in his blood. "My grandfather, Reece Whitaker, opened Whitaker's Hardware Store in Rector, Arkansas, in 1905," he says. The store stayed open in Rector until 1934 when the family relocated to Portageville, Missouri...
Once upon a family history: Siblings compile, publish family history for patriarch Wilbert Welker (06/02/14)
Ask Wilbert Welker about his life and he'll grin and say that, "A lot of the time, I don't know how I got from where I was to where I'm at." Which isn't exactly true. He remembers. He likes to tell stories, too, but with 94 years to pick from, where do you start?...
'Brady Bunch' actress Ann B. Davis dies (06/02/14)
Emmy-winning actress Ann B. Davis, who became the country's favorite and most famous housekeeper as the devoted Alice Nelson of "The Brady Bunch," died Sunday at a San Antonio hospital. She was 88. Bexar County, Texas, medical examiner's investigator Sara Horne said Davis died Sunday morning at University Hospital. Horne said no cause of death was available and that an autopsy was planned today...
Years of history in McLain's Chapel (06/01/14)
"There's a church in the valley by the wildwood -- No lovelier place in the dale. No spot is so dear to my childhood As the little brown church in the vale." The color is different, but the feeling is the same as that expressed in the song "Church in the Wildwood" for the generations who attended McLain's Chapel from its mid-19th Century origin until it was closed in 1973...
At D-Day's 70th, an overdue talk with a vet uncle (06/01/14)
AMBLER, Pa. -- My mother is the second-youngest of 14 children, and her five eldest siblings served overseas in World War II. They were our version of the famed Sullivan brothers, but with a happy ending: All made it home. Though one brother died in a 1948 car crash, I grew up around the other four, seeing them almost every Sunday after church while my grandmother was still living, and at family picnics that inevitably featured volleyball, Aunty Betty's decadent cakes, and the low roar of two dozen simultaneous conversations.. ...
Decades-old photos emerge of Apollo training (06/01/14)
HONOLULU -- Before Apollo astronauts went to the moon, they went to Hawaii to train on the Big Island's lunar volcanic landscapes. Now, decades-old photos are surfacing of astronauts scooping up Hawaii's soil and riding across volcanic fields in a "moon buggy" vehicle...
19th-century English-Spanish newspaper given to St. Louis library (05/30/14)
ST. LOUIS -- Nine copies of a little-remembered local business newspaper that was published in Spanish and English during the late 1800s have been donated to a growing media-history collection at the Central Library in downtown St. Louis. The eight-page bilingual monthly newspaper called itself El Comercio del Valle (Commerce of the Valley), with a drawing of the Eads Bridge on the masthead. ...
Buried gold coins go up for sale (05/29/14)
SAN FRANCISCO -- A treasure trove of rare gold coins discovered by a California couple out walking their dog has gone on sale, with one coin selling for $15,000 on Tuesday. The coins date from 1847 to 1894 and have been valued at $11 million. Several coins were auctioned at the Old San Francisco Mint at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, and one of them -- an 1874 $20 double eagle that is usually worth $4,250 -- sold for $15,000...
Poet Maya Angelou dies at 86 (05/29/14)
NEW YORK -- Maya Angelou, a modern Renaissance woman who survived the harshest of childhoods to become a force on stage, screen, the printed page and the inaugural dais, died Wednesday, her son said. She was 86. Angelou's son, Guy B. Johnson, said the writer died at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she had been a professor of American studies at Wake Forest University since 1982...
Former slaves who fought in Civil War remembered (05/27/14)
ST. LOUIS -- They fought for a country that refused to recognize them as citizens and died in virtual anonymity, their remains lumped together in a single burial plot. For nearly 150 years, the freed slaves of the 56th United States Colored Infantry who fought for the Union Army in the Civil War were a historical footnote, buried in a mass grave after cholera killed the troops as they prepared to go home. ...
Missouri man chronicles losses on WWII subs (05/25/14)
ST. LOUIS -- Serving aboard an American submarine was one of the most dangerous assignments in World War II, with nearly 1 in five crew members losing their lives somewhere in the ocean depths. Paul Wittmer of suburban St. Louis has spent years working to ensure those men -- more than 3,600 sailors -- are remembered, including writing a book that has been years in the making...
Fountain Street cabin makes most endangered places list (05/21/14)
Missouri Preservation announced its 2014 List of Most Endangered Places on Tuesday, including the The Franz Schmidt Cabin at 818 N. Fountain St. in Cape Girardeau. The endangered sites were identified at a Missouri Preservation news conference at the Henry Blosser House in Malta Bend, Missouri, which also is included on the list, a news release said...
Executions, methods still divisive (05/18/14)
Editor's note: This is the first in a series of stories covering the pending execution of Russell Bucklew at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday. Look for the next installment in Monday's newspaper. A painting adorns the wall in the Cape Girardeau County prosecuting attorney's office in Jackson. At first glance, the artwork appears to tell the story of a simpler time when horse-drawn buggies were the common mode of travel, but closer inspection reveals a much more serious tale...
Death penalty in Southeast Missouri timeline (05/18/14)
(Before executions began in Missouri's gas chamber in the 1930s, legal hangings were held in the state's counties. A comprehensive list of these executions could not be found. A few instances of legal hangings in Southeast Missouri were found from a variety of sources.)...
Group seeks to fly Confederate flag at memorial cemetery (05/13/14)
HIGGINSVILLE, Mo. -- A decade after Missouri's governor ordered the Confederate battle flag removed from two state historic sites, a group whose ancestors were Confederate soldiers wants the banner to fly full time again. The Sons of Confederate Veterans is boosting its efforts to fly the rebel flag over the cemetery at the Confederate Memorial Historic Site in Higginsville by reaching out to state lawmakers from the area, The Columbia Daily Tribune reported...
New findings from Callaway County battlefield (05/12/14)
COLUMBIA, Mo. -- A drive down Route JJ from Calwood to Fulton in Callaway County passes quiet meadows and woods that last year gave up ample evidence of a violent, noisy past. Nearly 200 artifacts of battle, ranging from unfired bullets to coat buttons, were uncovered in a comprehensive archaeological survey that employed metal detectors, GPS equipment and dozens of volunteers. ...
Jo Ann Bock recalls details about life in Cape Girardeau back to the Great Depression in her book (05/09/14)
You learn a lot from living a long life in a small city, and former Cape Girardeau Central High School teacher Jo Ann Bock's book, "Around the Town of Cape Girardeau in 80 Years," is proof. Published last year by the Center for Regional History at Southeast Missouri State University, the 203-page work melds Bock's recollections with details about life in Cape Girardeau back to the Great Depression...
Endangered Buildings List grows (05/09/14)
More than a dozen buildings are featured on this year's Endangered Buildings List, released by the Cape Girardeau Historic Preservation Commission. This is up from last year's list, when 11 structures were considered endangered. The commission accepts nominations for the list and evaluates each suggestion based on historical or architectural significance, whether the structure is neglected or abandoned and whether anything can be done to save the building...
2014 Endangered Buildings (05/09/14)
* Broadway Theater, 805 Broadway...
Pioneer Orchard has been in the Beggs family for more than 90 years (05/08/14)
Editor's note: This story is the second in a series about local farms and farmers. Fuzzy buds the size of thumbnails cling to the limbs of peach trees lined in rows at the Beggs' Pioneer Orchard off Silver Springs Road in Cape Girardeau. Starting next week, many of those buds will be picked in a process called thinning, leaving an average of 6 inches between each bud and allowing better size and flavor in the growing fruit, Bill and Diana Beggs said...
Schmittzehe's legacy lives on at VIP Industries (05/08/14)
Hilary Schmittzehe's friends and family are saying goodbye to him this week, but his legacy lives on in the company he helped start and the employees whose lives he touched. The longtime CEO of VIP Industries died Monday at age 84. "He spent a big part of his life toward making life better for the handicapped," said Richard Aufdenberg, chairman of VIP's board of directors...
Maintenance, upkeep growing issues for cemeteries near and far (05/06/14)
Toppled headstones of a husband and wife long deceased. Ivy hiding the identities of babies who never reached age 1. Faded flowers left by a daughter who has since died herself. These scenes are becoming more common as the nation and its cemeteries age...
Celebrating Jackson and 200 years of history (05/06/14)
The city of Jackson was established in 1814 as a "seat of justice" for the newly formed Cape Girardeau County. That makes our city 200 years old, and we are really celebrating our bicentennial. We started in January with a reading of proclamations from the county commission, state Sen. Wayne Wallingford, state Rep. Donna Lichtenegger and me...
History Alive! group to host USO dance Saturday (05/02/14)
A couple of years ago, Southeast Missouri State University senior Lindsey Lotz and several peers formed the not-for-profit History Alive! Living History Interpretive Group, and Saturday members will re-create a 1944 USO dance in Cape Girardeau. The program will take place at 6:30 p.m. at VFW Post 3838, 1049 N. Kingshighway...
Children of victim hope Sinn Fein leader is charged (05/02/14)
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- For decades, Helen McKendry has demanded Sinn Fein chief Gerry Adams come clean about the Irish Republican Army's abduction, slaying and secret burial of her mother in 1972, and his alleged role as the outlawed group's Belfast leader who ordered the killing...
'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' actor Bob Hoskins dies at 71 (05/01/14)
LONDON -- Bob Hoskins never lost his Cockney accent, even as he became a global star who charmed and alarmed audiences in a vast range of roles. Short and bald, with a face he once compared to "a squashed cabbage," Hoskins was a versatile performer. As a London gangster in "The Long Good Friday," he moved from bravura bluster to tragic understatement. In "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," he cavorted with a cast of animated characters, making technological trickery seem seamless and natural...
Southeast student details history of Cape buildings (04/28/14)
Southeast Missouri State University historic preservation major Lindsey Lotz has put her book learning into practice in a variety of ways -- from volunteering at Bollinger Mill State Historic Site to creating posters for historic downtown Cape Girardeau buildings...
Praying with the enemy: Minister had compassion, even for Nazi war criminals (04/27/14)
Henry "Hank" Gerecke has his father's pale blue eyes. They soften as he stares out the kitchen window of his Cape Girardeau home. He's remembering the man who taught him how to look at the world. At 93 years old, he blinks slowly, shrugs and says simply: "I adored my father." Some of history's most notorious mass murderers adored his father, too.
Humanities Council awards grant for Kent Library celebration (04/25/14)
The Missouri Humanities Council has awarded a $7,168 grant to help underwrite events for the 75th anniversary celebration of Kent Library at Southeast Missouri State University, according to a news release. The yearlong celebration began in November and will include a free speaker series featuring experts on Southeast Missouri history...
Pope John XXIII to be canonized Sunday (04/24/14)
VATICAN CITY -- On the night of Oct. 11, 1962, Pope John XXIII did something so natural that it's astonishing it was so revolutionary at the time. He came to the window of the Vatican's Apostolic Palace and spoke to thousands of candle-bearing faithful below -- not in the arcane, scripted words of pontiffs past but in those of a father and pastor looking out for his flock...
Southeast students help produce 'Battle of Kushtia' documentary (04/23/14)
A small group of Southeast Missouri State University students has joined a fledgling New York film director in producing "The Battle of Kushtia," a documentary about Bangladesh's war of independence and the late Dan Coggin, one of the first journalists to cover it...
Central marks 20-year anniversary of state baseball title (04/23/14)
A daring Tigers team won the Class 4 state baseball title in 1994
Ozarks survivor of Pearl Harbor dies (04/21/14)
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- The last known Pearl Harbor survivor living in the Ozarks has died. The Springfield News-Leader reported William Martin died last week at age 90. His family said Martin died in the Missouri Veterans Home in Mount Vernon. Martin was 18 when Japanese planes bombed a U.S. ...
Prizefighter 'Hurricane' Carter dies at 76 (04/21/14)
His boxing career came to an abrupt end when he was imprisoned for three 1966 murders committed in Paterson, N.J.
Student fought bureaucrats for justice for Holocaust survivors (04/20/14)
AMSTERDAM -- Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working part-time in Amsterdam's archives when she and other interns came across a shocking find: letters from Jewish Holocaust survivors complaining the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi death camps...
Author, Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez dies at 87 (04/18/14)
MEXICO CITY -- Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez crafted intoxicating fiction from the fatalism, fantasy, cruelty and heroics of the world that set his mind churning as a child growing up on Colombia's Caribbean coast. One of the most revered and influential writers of his generation, he brought Latin America's charm and maddening contradictions to life in the minds of millions and became the best-known practitioner of "magical realism," a blending of fantastic elements into portrayals of daily life that made the extraordinary seem almost routine.. ...
Search continues for woman who vanished in 1979 (04/17/14)
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second in a two-part series on the 1979 disappearance of Cheryl Scherer. Cheryl Scherer's parents were relieved when her work schedule changed. It wasn't as if anything dangerous ever happened in a small town like Scott City, but the 6 a.m.-to-2 p.m. shift seemed safer for a young gas station attendant than the night shift she'd been working, her sister said...
T. rex gets new home in Smithsonian dinosaur hall (04/16/14)
WASHINGTON -- More than 100 years after dinosaurs were first displayed on the National Mall, T. rex -- the king -- is joining the Smithsonian collection after a 2,000-mile journey from Montana. Paleontologists and curators unveiled parts of a nearly complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton Tuesday, including its jaw with teeth as big as bananas, at the National Museum of Natural History. ...
Family marks 35 years since teen disappeared (04/13/14)
Diane Scherer-Morris smiles as she remembers growing up on her parents' farm in old Illmo with her sister, Cheryl, and brother, Anthony.
New technology unwraps mummies' ancient mysteries (04/10/14)
LONDON -- Our fascination with mummies never gets old. Now the British Museum is using the latest technology to unwrap their ancient mysteries. Scientists at the museum have used CT scans and sophisticated imaging software to go beneath the bandages, revealing skin, bones, preserved internal organs -- and in one case a brain-scooping rod left inside a skull by embalmers...
Actor Mickey Rooney dies at 93 (04/08/14)
LOS ANGELES -- Mickey Rooney's approach to life was simple: "Let's put on a show!" He spent nine decades doing it, on the big screen, on television, on stage and in his extravagant personal life. A superstar in his youth, Rooney was Hollywood's top box-office draw in the late 1930s to early 1940s. He epitomized the "show" part of show business, even if the business end sometimes failed him amid money troubles and a seesaw of career tailspins and revivals...
Mining town comes and goes, comes back again (04/07/14)
NECK CITY, Mo. -- It's hard to get lost here. Neck City: Four blocks wide and about as long. No churches. Only one business: The U.S. Post Office. "There haven't really been any other businesses to speak of since I've lived here. That's been 46 years," says Gary Miller, the town's unofficial historian, as he empties out a packet of black and white photos onto a table. ...
Balloon release to mark anniversary of woman's disappearance (04/06/14)
Friends and family will gather for a balloon release April 13 at St. Denis Parish Center in Benton, Mo., to observe the anniversary of the disappearance of Cheryl Anne Scherer. Scherer, 19, was abducted nearly 35 years ago from the Rhodes gas station where she worked on Main Street in Scott City...
Young people's role in civil rights movement discussed (04/04/14)
The civil rights movement was populated by more than just legendary figures such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. It included children of the era who became symbols that inspired others to get involved, Dr. Wilma King said during Thursday night's Dugger Lecture...
'Van Dyke' DVDs spotlight Moore's comedic genius (04/02/14)
NEW YORK -- Like any "Dick Van Dyke Show" fan, he's happy to catch a rerun of the show while flipping channels. "If there's nothing new to watch, I'll let the episode play out," said Carl Reiner. "I'm always pleased to see how well those episodes have aged."...
Orson Welles' camera, other items up for auction (04/01/14)
PHOENIX -- The youngest daughter of director and writer Orson Welles is giving film buffs a chance to buy some of his personal possessions, including a camera, scripts and photos from the set of "Citizen Kane." Beatrice Welles discovered the relics last year in boxes and trunks and decided to put them up for auction. She said her father would have preferred making the memorabilia available to film buffs and fans as opposed to sending them to a museum...
Historic convent slated for demolition (03/31/14)
BEL-NOR, Mo. -- Standing inside a gutted chapel on the fringe of the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the director of facilities management on campus paused to take a whiff of the musty air. "Can you smell the mold?" Frank Kochin asked during a tour. "It's worse in the basement."...
Perry County Military History Museum's Wall of Honor will be dedicated April 12 (03/28/14)
PERRYVILLE, Mo. -- The heroism of four Army soldiers who perished in the Vietnam War will be memorialized during the April 12 dedication of the Perry County Military History Museum's new Wall of Honor in Perryville City Park. The soldiers are Raymond Fordyce, who died in 1966; Gary Ernst, a casualty of the fighting in 1967; and Thomas Loos and Darrell Lintner, who died in 1968...
Former defense secretary James Schlesinger dies at age 85 (03/28/14)
WASHINGTON -- Onetime economics professor and longtime nuclear strategist James R. Schlesinger was a political man for all seasons, holding a long string of Cabinet and other high-level posts through three administrations. He was hired -- and dismissed -- by presidents of both parties...
Auditor: Historic building tax credit costly (03/26/14)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- Missouri's tax incentive for the renovation of historic buildings is the largest such program in the nation but is inefficient and not adequately overseen, the state auditor said Tuesday. A report from Auditor Tom Schweich said Missouri has paid out $1.1 billion of historic preservation tax credits during the past decade, resulting in average annual rehabilitation expenses that are significantly higher than any of 29 other states with similar programs...
Former state prison to resume tours in April (03/24/14)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- Starting in April, Missouri residents will once again have the chance to tour a former state prison. Tours in limited areas of the Missouri State Penitentiary are scheduled to resume on April 21, The Jefferson City News-Tribune reported. The Jefferson City Convention and Visitors Bureau announced that full walk-throughs of the facility would begin July 1...
Former Florsheim employees hold reunion (03/24/14)
The Cape Girardeau region was a hub of shoe manufacturing in 1907 with the likes of Roberts, Johnson and Rand Shoe Co., the International Shoe Co. and Florsheim Shoe Co. About 35 to 40 people who worked at Florsheim factories across the region were on hand for a reunion Sunday at Cape Girardeau Eagles Club No. 3775...
Former Spanish prime minister Suarez dies at 81 (03/24/14)
MADRID -- Adolfo Suarez, Spain's first democratically elected prime minister after decades of right-wing rule under Gen. Francisco Franco, has died aged 81. Suarez died Sunday afternoon in Madrid's Cemtro Clinic hospital, family spokesman Fermin Urbiola said. Suarez had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease for a decade...
John Love, Bataan Death March survivor, dies at 91 (03/23/14)
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- John E. Love, a Bataan Death March survivor who led a campaign to change the caption on a historic march photo from The Associated Press, has died. He was 91. Love died Monday after a long battle with cancer, said Gerry Lightwine, pastor at La Vida Llena, an Albuquerque retirement home where Love lived...
Scrap dealer's bargain turns out to be one of 8 missing Faberge eggs (03/20/14)
LONDON -- There is good luck, outrageous good fortune -- and now there is the case of the scrap metal dealer who found one of the eight missing Faberge imperial eggs at a flea market in the American Midwest. A London antique dealer said Wednesday that the scrap metal entrepreneur bought the egg for about $14,000, thinking he could make a small profit by reselling the piece for its gold content...
Missing Malaysian airliner may be an enduring mystery (03/19/14)
WELLINGTON, New Zealand -- The plane must be somewhere. But the same can be said for Amelia Earhart's. Ten days after Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared with 239 people aboard, an international search has produced no sign of the Boeing 777, raising an unsettling question: What if the airplane is never found?...
Evidence spotted for universe's early growth spurt (03/18/14)
NEW YORK -- Researchers say they have spotted evidence that a split-second after the Big Bang, the newly formed universe ballooned out at a pace so astonishing that it left behind ripples in the fabric of the cosmos. If confirmed, experts said, the discovery would be a major advance in the understanding of the early universe. Although many scientists already believed that an initial, extremely rapid growth spurt happened, they have long sought the evidence cited in the new study...
Veteran Hollywood reporter Bob Thomas dead at 92 (03/16/14)
He was the institutional memory for the movies at The Associated Press and a passage for the world to a Hollywood both longed for and long gone. Bob Thomas, who died Friday at his Encino, Calif., home at age 92, started reporting when Clark Gable was a middle-aged king, Bette Davis was in her big-eyed prime, and Kirk Douglas and Lauren Bacall were emerging stars. ...
Survivors: Pope Francis saved many in dirty wars (03/14/14)
SAN MIGUEL, Argentina -- Gonzalo Mosca was a radical on the run. Hunted by Uruguay's dictators, he fled to Argentina, where he narrowly escaped a military raid on his hideout. "I thought that they would kill me at any moment," Mosca said. With nowhere else to turn, he called his brother, a Jesuit priest, who put him in touch with the man he credits with saving his life: Jorge Mario Bergoglio...
World's oldest masks on display in Jerusalem (03/12/14)
JERUSALEM -- The oldest known masks in the world went on display in Jerusalem on Tuesday in the largest-ever exhibit of the ghoulish faces, believed to have been created in the Holy Land thousands of years before the time of the Bible. The 11 stone masks, said to have been discovered in the Judean desert and hills near Jerusalem, date back 9,000 years and offer a rare glimpse at some of civilization's first communal rituals...
New York killing still fascinates 50 years later (03/12/14)
NEW YORK -- Kitty Genovese's screams for help couldn't save her on the night she was murdered outside her apartment in 1964. Fifty years later, those screams still echo, a symbol of urban breakdown and city dwellers' seeming callousness toward their neighbors...
Gettysburg wax museum selling historical figures (03/10/14)
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- A life-size animatronic Abe Lincoln is among the historical figures and tableau scenes from a Gettysburg wax museum set to hit the auction block just months after the town celebrated the 150th anniversary of his "Gettysburg Address."...
Missing St. Louis mural found during renovations (03/09/14)
ST. LOUIS -- A 28-foot-long mural that graced St. Louis Union Station starting in the 1940s was thought to be lost. It turns out it was just hiding. The mural "Commerce on the Landing" was painted by Chicago artist Louis Grell and mounted over the station's ticket counter in 1942. At some point it was taken away. No one was sure what happened to it...
Governor nominates Cape residents to optometry, historical records boards (03/09/14)
Gov. Jay Nixon has made nominations to seven state boards and commissions, which include two local nominees. Kyle E. Brost of Cape Girardeau was named to the State Board of Optometry. He has operated a family eye business in Cape Girardeau since 1989 and is a paramedical health professional with Perry County Memorial Hospital in Perryville, Mo. He is past president of the Missouri Optometric Association and is a graduate of the University of Missouri-St. Louis School of Optometry...
Kellermans receive McReynolds Award (03/07/14)
Drs. Mary Ann and Bert Kellerman of Cape Girardeau were among four winners of the 2014 McReynolds Award, given annually by the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation, to recognize individuals or groups that have demonstrated long-term commitment to preservation. ...
Seabees monument will be unveiled in Bloomfield (03/06/14)
BLOOMFIELD, Mo. -- U.S. Navy Seabee veterans are working throughout the nation to recognize fallen comrades. A monument serving that purpose will be unveiled Saturday at the Missouri State Veterans Cemetery at Bloomfield. A Seabee is a member of the Navy's Construction Battalion; the word Seabee comes from the initials "CB." Seabees often built bases, airstrips and roads for their fellow soldiers...
Calif. gold discovery spurs theories (03/05/14)
LOS ANGELES -- Word last week that a Northern California couple found $10 million in gold coins while walking their dog has set off a Gold Rush of theories over who left behind all that loot. One is that Jesse James' gang deposited it in hopes of someday financing a second Civil War. Another postulates that the gold originally belonged to gentleman robber Black Bart, who wrote poetry when he wasn't sticking up stagecoaches...
St. Louis Art Museum displaying Nazi-confiscated artworks (03/03/14)
ST. LOUIS -- In a first-floor gallery at the St. Louis Art Museum hangs a life-size portrait of three bathing women and a small red turtle. The painting, by Henri Matisse, changed the course of art, and is considered one of the most influential 20th-century paintings in the United States...
Work on Broadway stormwater project delayed by weather (03/03/14)
Inclement winter weather has led to several problems around Cape Girardeau. Perhaps one of the most obvious is the delay it's caused in work along the 200 block of Merriwether Street, which is part of the Broadway Stormwater Relief project. During heavy downpours, water backs up along the sides of Broadway, creating shallow pools as it slowly enters the drainage system. The stormwater relief project will install new pipes underground to convey that water to the Merriwether storm tunnel...
Oliver-Leming House owners among Old Town Cape honorees (02/28/14)
Members of the community gathered to honor those instrumental in the rehabilitation and restoration of downtown Cape Girardeau at the Old Town Cape annual dinner on Thursday evening at Isle Casino Cape Girardeau. Drs. Bert and Mary Ann Kellerman took home two of the six awards Old Town Cape presented at the event, the first being the Judith Ann Crow Residential Historic Rehabilitation Award for the couple's work rehabilitating the Oliver-Leming House, home of the Missouri state flag...
Union County Museum adds local flavor to Smithsonian sports exhibit (02/28/14)
COBDEN, Ill. -- The Union County Museum is hosting "Hometown Teams," a Smithsonian Institution exhibit that explores the relationship between towns and their sports teams. The exhibit, which opens Saturday with a ribbon-cutting at 10 a.m. and runs through April 13, features artifacts and tales of championship runs, rivalries and traditions...
Parts of the Sprague might be sold (02/26/14)
VICKSBURG, Miss. (AP) -- The fate of the remaining metal pieces taken from the steamboat Sprague, which was destroyed by fire in 1974, is in the hands of Vicksburg officials. The Board of Mayor and Aldermen is considering whether to display them or declare some of items surplus and sell them as scrap...
Professor offers insight on Frederick Douglass (02/24/14)
Before he was revered as a significant figure in civil rights history, Frederick Douglass was a bit of a rabble rouser, Dr. Debra Foster Greene, professor of American History at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Mo., told an audience at the Cape Girardeau Public Library on Sunday...
Altenburg museum marks 175th anniversary of Lutheran immigration (02/23/14)
ALTENBURG, Mo. -- You see history just about everywhere you look in East Perry County. In Altenburg, population 350, there's the Log Cabin College, forerunner of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod's Concordia Seminary in St. Louis; Trinity Lutheran Church, founded in 1867; and the Lutheran Heritage Center & Museum, which is observing the 175th anniversary of the immigration of 700 Lutherans from Saxony, Germany. ...
Former Cape police chief Butch Boyd dies at 73 (02/19/14)
Former Cape Girardeau police chief Howard "Butch" Boyd, 73, died at his home in Cape Girardeau on Tuesday. Born in Cape Girardeau in 1940, Boyd, weighed only 3 pounds because of his premature birth and earned his nickname "Butch" from the nurses because he was "a survivor."...
103 Torah scrolls from Hungary found in Russia (02/19/14)
BUDAPEST, Hungary -- Hungarian Jewish leaders say they have found 103 Torah scrolls taken from Hungary during the Holocaust in a Russian library. Rabbi Slomo Koves said Tuesday the sacred texts were discovered in the manuscript section of the Lenin State Regional Library of the western Russian city of Nizhny Novgorod...
Families explore "Civil War Times" at Crisp Museum (02/16/14)
Women in hoop skirts and men toting antique rifles greeted visitors at the River Campus on Saturday afternoon. About a dozen Civil War re-enactors set up demonstration tables as part of the Crisp Museum "Civil War Times" event. Dressed in period fashion, they displayed firearms, crafts, games and even teas that were popular during the Civil War...
Ancient baby DNA suggests tie to Native Americans (02/13/14)
NEW YORK -- The DNA of a baby boy who was buried in Montana 12,600 years ago has been recovered, and it provides new indications of the ancient roots of today's American Indians and other native peoples of the Americas. It's the oldest genome ever recovered from the New World. Artifacts found with the body show the boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America from about 13,000 years ago to about 12,600 years ago and is named for an archaeological site near Clovis, N.M...
Panel ponders changes to Missouri flag (02/12/14)
After 100 years, the Missouri state flag could see a few changes. A Missouri House committee held a public hearing last week to consider legislation that would create a commission to study the flag. Under House Bill 1241, the commission would include eight members appointed by the governor from each congressional district plus the Secretary of State or their designee, who will serve as chairman of the commission...
Shirley Temple, iconic child star, dies at 85 (02/12/14)
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Shirley Temple, the dimpled, curly-haired child star who sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers, has died. She was 85. Temple, known in private life as Shirley Temple Black, died Monday night at her home near San Francisco. She was surrounded by family members and caregivers, publicist Cheryl Kagan said...
Pope's announcement changed church (02/11/14)
VATICAN CITY -- It was the quietest of announcements that had the effect of a thunderclap on the Catholic world: A year ago today, Pope Benedict XVI said in a voice so soft that cardinals strained to hear (and in a Latin not all could easily follow) that he was becoming the first pontiff to resign in more than half a millennium. ...
Union Station in K.C. to recreate King Tut's tomb (02/10/14)
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Union Station in Kansas City will be turned into Egypt this summer, when visitors will be able to re-create the discovery of King Tut's tomb. Station officials announced this week that the exhibit, "The Discovery of King Tut," will run from April 7 to Sept. 7. It is the largest exhibit ever attempted at the station, and will be the first stop for the exhibit in the United States...
St. Louis building, iconic mural razed by mistake (02/10/14)
ST. LOUIS -- An iconic mural of a hippie -- and the St. Louis building on which it was painted -- are gone from a neighborhood near downtown, and a clerical error is to blame. The 1890 building stood in a protected historic district, and the garage door's mural of a hippie named Beardy McGreen, flashing a peace sign, had been something of a landmark since 2006...
'Dance Through the Ages' kicks off Jackson bicentenial commemorations (02/10/14)
Jackson is nearing its 200th anniversary July 4, and the yearlong celebration started with an afternoon whirl on the dance floor Sunday. The bicentennial city's "Dance Through the Ages" drew 150 people to American Legion Post 158, 319 N. High St. "There is a lot of history in our community," said city outreach committee member Janice Lumsden. "We want to honor the older generation and the history they have, and educate the younger generation and involve them as well."...
Martin Luther King Jr.'s children battling over estate (02/07/14)
ATLANTA -- A generation after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s death, his children are fighting among themselves again, this time over two of their father's most cherished possessions: his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal and the Bible he carried...
A look back at allegations against Woody Allen (02/05/14)
NEW YORK -- "Cries and Whispers: The Ugly Explosion of an Unconventional Family," announced the Aug. 31, 1992, cover of Time magazine, which bore Woody Allen's bespectacled face. The saga involving Allen and erstwhile romantic partner Mia Farrow had exploded into the public consciousness days earlier. The most sensational part: an allegation the celebrated director had taken their adopted daughter Dylan, 7, into an attic-like space at Farrow's Connecticut home and molested her...
Limbaughs discuss integration in Cape Girardeau (02/04/14)
Local civil rights history is similar in many respects to most of the Midwest and South, but Cape Girardeau holds the distinction of having integrated after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling rather than waiting for the U.S. Civil Rights Act 10 years later...
Anna, Ill., prepares for third annual Civil War Weekend (01/31/14)
Anna, Ill. -- Even 150 years after the War between the States, events such as the Civil War Weekend in Anna find new ways to examine one of the most turbulent times in the nation's history. The three-day event, Feb. 7 through 9, gives local history enthusiasts an opportunity to enjoy exhibits, tours and speeches that describe the effect of the war on Southern Illinois and Southeast Missouri...
Folk singer, activist Pete Seeger dies in New York (01/29/14)
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Unable to carry his beloved banjo, Pete Seeger used a different but equally formidable instrument, his mere presence, to instruct yet another generation of young people how to effect change through song and determination two years ago...
Appleton Mercantile sells artifacts from old homes and buildings (01/27/14)
OLD APPLETON, Mo. -- One thing leads to another in life, and therein lies its unpredictability. It was like that for Mike and Carole Harvell, whose Cape Girardeau bathroom and kitchen renovation business three years ago branched into their -- at times -- exotic Old Appleton enterprise of dealing in artifacts from late 19th- and early 20th-century homes and buildings...
MU founder's descendants seek atonement (01/27/14)
COLUMBIA, Mo. -- The descendants of the man dubbed the "father of the University of Missouri" are working to atone for their relative's slave-holding past. Clay Mering grew up hearing stories of how his great-grandfather, James Sidney Rollins, promoted and raised money for the state's flagship university, the Columbia Missourian reported. ...
Illustrated map to promote Grant Trail in area (01/27/14)
The Civil War travels of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant are well known in northeast and east-central Missouri, but his activities in the southeast part of the state have been sparsely promoted. Four groups have joined forces to promote the U.S. Grant Trail from St. Louis to Cape Girardeau to the nation's legion of Civil War enthusiasts...
Study: New Madrid fault zone alive and active (01/24/14)
LOS ANGELES -- The New Madrid fault zone in the nation's midsection is active and could spawn future large earthquakes, scientists reported Thursday. It's "not dead yet," said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Susan Hough, who was part of the study published online by the journal Science...
Talk to explore roles of women in Civil War (01/24/14)
Patti House tells tale of 'unwanted, untrained, indispensable' women
George W. Bush library archives open to public (01/21/14)
DALLAS -- The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum on Monday began accepting Freedom of Information Act requests for records from Bush's presidency. The day marks five years from the end of Bush's presidency on Jan. 20, 2009. Access to the records is governed by the Presidential Records Act, which says the records may be requested by the public five years after the presidential administration ends...
Kansas City WWI memorial ready for center stage (01/20/14)
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) -- The approaching centennial of the First World War will draw a lot of attention to Kansas City, home of the largest and oldest repository of information about the Great War this side of the Imperial War Museums in London...
SAG honors Moreno's life of screen achievements (01/20/14)
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- She's won Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony awards, but Rita Moreno had to pull the car over when the call came that she would receive the SAG Life Achievement Award. "It was stunning news," Moreno said, "the last thing in the world I would have ever expected."...
Russell Johnson, 'Gilligan' professor, has died (01/17/14)
NEW YORK (AP) -- Actor Russell Johnson, who became known to generations of TV fans as "The Professor," the fix-it man who kept his fellow "Gilligan's Island" castaways supplied with gadgets, has died. He was 89. Johnson died Thursday morning at his home in Washington State of natural causes, said his agent, Mike Eisenstadt...
'Wizard of Oz' Munchkin Ruth Robinson Duccini dies (01/17/14)
LAS VEGAS (AP) -- Ruth Robinson Duccini, the last of the original female Munchkins from the 1939 movie "The Wizard of Oz," has died. She was 95. With her death, only one actor who played one of the original 124 Munchkins in the movie remains alive...
Arkansas court ruling draws attention to racial disparities (01/15/14)
Five decades and $1 billion after an infamous racial episode made Little Rock, Ark., a national symbol of school segregation, the legal fight to ensure that all of its children receive equal access to education is almost over. But many challenges still remain, in Little Rock and across the country...
Death penalty foes mark 25 years of executions in Mo. (01/14/14)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- As Missouri prepares to execute its third inmate in the past few months, a group of death penalty opponents urged state lawmakers Monday to halt executions. Missourians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty gathered at the state Capitol to mark 25 years since the state resumed executions. Reggie Griffin, who was recently cleared of a capital punishment case in Missouri, spoke in support of ending the death penalty...
Israel's Ariel Sharon laid to rest in military funeral (01/14/14)
JERUSALEM -- Ariel Sharon was laid to rest Monday at his ranch in southern Israel as the nation bid a final farewell to one of its most colorful and influential leaders -- a man venerated by supporters as a warrior and statesman but reviled in the Arab world as a war criminal...
Sharon, Israel's bulldozer in politics, dies at 85 (01/12/14)
JERUSALEM -- It was vintage Ariel Sharon: His hefty body bobbing behind a wall of security men, the ex-general led a march onto a Jerusalem holy site, staking a bold claim to a shrine that has been in contention from the dawn of the Arab-Israeli conflict...
Cold weather means early ice harvest at NH camps (01/10/14)
HOLDERNESS, N.H. (AP) -- The tradition of harvesting lake ice at a New Hampshire campground is off to a cold and early start. Crews started sawing blocks for the Rockywold-Deephaven Camps in Holderness on Thursday, something they've been doing for more than a century...
Truman sites stay closed because of 2013 budget cuts (01/07/14)
INDEPENDENCE, Mo. -- Sites related to former president Harry Truman apparently will remain closed for the foreseeable future because federal budget cuts enacted last year remain in place, the sites' director said. The Truman Home in Independence, where Harry and Bess Truman lived for most of their married lives, is open Tuesday through Saturday, but not seven days a week like it used to be. ...
Military museum's new Mo. location to open this year (01/06/14)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- A museum featuring more than a century's worth of military artifacts is moving to a new location in Jefferson City. The Jefferson City News-Tribune reported the Museum of Missouri Military History opened in 1999 and sees about 3,000 visitors annually. ...
Everly Brothers' Phil dead at 74 (01/05/14)
NEW YORK -- Art Garfunkel answered the door to his Manhattan apartment holding a framed black-and-white picture of two smiling men. It was a test. Correctly identifying Phil and Don Everly in the picture would reveal me as a journalist knowledgeable about music and the roots of Garfunkel's career. Flustered, I failed...
St. Louis mulling changes for soldiers museum (01/05/14)
ST. LOUIS -- St. Louis leaders are pursuing changes to the operations of the city-owned Soldiers Memorial Military Museum that has fallen into disrepair. The downtown museum's collection of war letters, weapons, uniforms and other artifacts has been neglected for years. The museum also needs more than $6 million in repairs...
Church renovating former synagogue in downtown Cape (12/30/13)
A church that has taken up residence in a former synagogue in downtown Cape Girardeau is bringing new life and plans for improvements to the historic building. The B'nai Israel Synagogue at 126 S. Main St. has seen various but limited uses for many years. The synagogue, built in 1937 in Spanish and Islamic styles, saw more regular Jewish religious use into the 1970s. But by the late 1980s, it held only limited worship services because of the decline of the area's Jewish population...
Mo. church's Civil War-era crèche figures get TLC (12/30/13)
ST. LOUIS -- A Civil War-era Nativity scene is about to be spruced up as part of a $10 million restoration of a landmark church next to the Gateway Arch. The life-size, cast-iron crèche figures have been a holiday staple for 147 years at the Basilica of St. ...
Grave marker project helps recognize blues musicians (12/29/13)
ST. LOUIS -- Blues guitarist Tommy Bankhead rubbed shoulders with some of the genre's royalty, from Howlin' Wolf and Elmore James to Albert King and Sonny Boy Williamson. But visitors to the overgrown St. Louis cemetery where Bankhead was buried more than a decade ago would never know his musical legacy. Or his name...
5 states receive grants to protect battlefields (12/24/13)
RICHMOND, Va. -- The National Park Service has awarded grants totaling $950,000 to help protect Civil War battlefields in five states. The battlefields include Carthage in Missouri, Peebles' Farm, First Rappahannock Station and Second Rappahannock Station in Virginia, South Mountain in Maryland, Brice's Crossroads in Mississippi and Bentonville in North Carolina...
Federal Reserve turns 100 years old (12/24/13)
WASHINGTON -- The press called it an early Christmas present for President Woodrow Wilson: On Dec. 23, 1913, Congress passed legislation creating the Federal Reserve. Hours later, Wilson signed the Federal Reserve Act into law. No one at the White House ceremony that day could foresee what the Fed has become: A titanic institution with power over people and economies worldwide...
Mutual Musicians Foundation prepares for 2017 centennial (12/23/13)
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The centennial celebration is starting early for a foundation that continues to host late-night jam sessions, nearly 100 years after it was founded as a segregated union for black musicians. The Kansas City Star reported that the centennial isn't until 2017 for the Mutual Musicians Foundation in the 18th and Vine Jazz District in Kansas City. ...
Memorials mark 1988 Lockerbie attack (12/22/13)
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Families of some of the 270 people who died in the bombing of an airliner over Scotland 25 years ago gathered Saturday for memorial services in the U.S. and Britain. Bagpipes played and wreaths were laid in the Scottish town of Lockerbie, and services were being held at London's Westminster Abbey...
New York town claims a link to 'Wonderful Life' (12/20/13)
SENECA FALLS, N.Y. -- Is this where George Bailey lived his wonderful life? Folks in this quaint upstate New York town think so. Or more precisely, they say Bailey's make-believe hometown of Bedford Falls in "It's a Wonderful Life" -- including the main street and the steel truss bridge -- was inspired by Seneca Falls...
'Mary Poppins' among 25 US films to be preserved (12/20/13)
WASHINGTON -- Just in time for a new movie about the making of "Mary Poppins," the 1964 Disney classic starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke has been selected for preservation at the Library of Congress so future generations of Americans can see it...
British film actor O'Toole, 81, dies (12/16/13)
LONDON -- Known on the one hand for his starring role in "Lawrence of Arabia," leading tribesmen in daring attacks across the desert wastes, and on the other for his headlong charges into drunken debauchery, Peter O'Toole was one of the most magnetic, charismatic and fun figures in British acting...
Cape lawyer appointed to state historic preservation council (12/15/13)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- Gov. Jay Nixon announced Friday he appointed local attorney Daniel A. Statler to the Missouri Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. According to a news release issued by Nixon's office, Statler has been appointed to the commission for a term that expires Nov. 15, 2016. Statler is an lawyer in Cape Girardeau who owns The Statler Law Firm and has been active in numerous local civic and not-for-profit groups...
New business to open in N'Orleans building (12/13/13)
A local restaurateur plans to open a new business this spring in the building that housed the Royal N'Orleans restaurant, city records show. Mark Dirnberger filed an application Wednesday for a business license to open a prepared food and beverage business called Katy O'Ferrell's in the long-vacant space at 300 Broadway. ...
Historic buildings pose unique challenges for firefighters (12/12/13)
From stately Victorian homes to classic brick storefronts, Cape Girardeau is rich with tangible links to the past. Protecting the city's architectural legacy, however, is more science than art or history. Several weeks ago, firefighters closed a side street and reduced Broadway to one lane for about 30 minutes as they investigated a report of smoke at a business in the area...
Pearl Harbor marks anniversary (12/08/13)
PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii -- About 50 survivors of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor paused Saturday at the site to honor those killed and remember the moment that plunged the U.S. into World War II. Alvis Taylor, 90, was serving as an Army medic when the attack began. His superiors, who were doctors, rushed to hospitals to care for the wounded and left him in charge. He went to Pearl Harbor, about 18 miles south of his Army post at Schofield Barracks, with dozens of ambulances...
Bosnia memories preserved in St. Louis (12/08/13)
ST. LOUIS -- Selma Avdagic was only an infant when her Bosnian family fled from Sarajevo to St. Louis two decades ago as war ravaged the former Yugoslavia. The college student knows her parents' immigration story well. How her mother, a doctor back home, worked a succession of low-wage jobs in the St. Louis suburbs until she could obtain a U.S. medical license. How her father, who remained behind for another year, was nearly killed by a Serbian soldier...
Former hostages react to Iran's nuclear deal (11/27/13)
McLEAN, Va. -- To some of the Americans subjected to mock executions and other torment during more than a year as hostages in Iran more than 30 years ago, it seems like a mistake to trust the regime in Tehran to keep its promises in a nuclear deal brokered by the U.S. and other world powers...
Vatican unveils bone fragments said to be Peter's (11/25/13)
VATICAN CITY -- The Vatican publicly unveiled a handful of bone fragments purportedly belonging to St. Peter on Sunday, reviving the scientific debate and tantalizing mystery over whether the relics found in a shoe box truly belong to the first pope...
When presidents die, power transfer can be chaotic (11/24/13)
NEW YORK -- As President John F. Kennedy lay dying 50 years ago at Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas, Vice President Lyndon Johnson was hurried into a small room in Minor Medicine, where he stood silently against a wall. After a wait of 35 minutes, presidential aide Kenneth O'Donnell entered and approached Johnson, who had been two cars behind Kennedy when the shots were fired in Dealey Plaza...
Solemn events will mark JFK anniversary today (11/22/13)
DALLAS -- Loose gatherings of the curious and conspiracy-minded at Dallas' Dealey Plaza have marked past anniversaries of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, featuring everything from makeshift memorials to marching drummers to discussions about who else might have been in on the killing...
SEMO professor talks about historic JFK moment (11/22/13)
The United States ground to a halt 50 years ago today as news broke that President John F. Kennedy had been shot during a presidential motorcade in Dallas. The memory of Jackie Kennedy, dressed in pink, climbing toward the back of the vehicle that was carrying the slumped president is seared in many people's memories...
A slice of time, half a century later (11/22/13)
PREFACE: Everyone of a certain age has a frozen memory of events that occurred 50 years ago today. These events changed the world, but not for the last time. My memory is no better than anyone else's, and everyone who was old enough to remember the day President Kennedy was shot can tell his or her own story. The story I am telling today is the story I know best: my own slice of time...
Obama pays tribute to John F. Kennedy legacy (11/21/13)
WASHINGTON -- Honoring the legacy of John F. Kennedy, President Barack Obama laid a wreath at the assassinated president's gravesite as a nation remembers that day in Dallas a half-century ago Friday. Obama also recognized a group of distinguished Americans -- including Bill Clinton and Oprah Winfrey -- with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, an award created by Kennedy...
Gettysburg speech commemorated (11/20/13)
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- Thousands gathered at a central Pennsylvania battlefield park Tuesday to honor a speech given 150 years ago that President Abraham Lincoln predicted would not be long remembered. The inspirational and famously short Gettysburg Address was praised for reinvigorating national ideals of freedom, liberty and justice amid a Civil War that had torn the country to pieces...
Do we know exact words of the Gettysburg Address? (11/19/13)
It was the biggest assignment of Joseph Ignatius Gilbert's journalistic career -- and he was in serious danger of blowing it. On Nov. 19, 1863, the 21-year-old Associated Press freelancer was standing before a "rude platform" overlooking the still-ravaged battlefield at Gettysburg, Pa. Towering above him was an almost mythic figure: Abraham Lincoln...
Pa. paper: Sorry for panning Gettysburg Address (11/15/13)
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- It took 150 years, but a Pennsylvania newspaper said Thursday it should have recognized the greatness of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address at the time it was delivered. The Patriot-News of Harrisburg, about 35 miles northeast of Gettysburg, retracted a dismissive editorial penned by its Civil War-era predecessor, The Harrisburg Patriot & Union...
Mo. hunters still dedicated to the quail (11/12/13)
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Bob Borman continues to cling to a dying tradition. He remembers days when little country cafes were filled with orange-clad hunters at this time of the year, when brushy fields were alive with quail, when the season opener was a major event...
Alton, Ill., erects marker honoring famed abolitionist (11/12/13)
ALTON, Ill. -- A southwestern Illinois city is honoring its ties to famed abolitionist and journalist Elijah Lovejoy with a new marker. The (Alton) Telegraph reported the newly installed, 22-by-44-inch marker commemorating Lovejoy has been unveiled in time for the observance of his death 176 years ago...
Jackson native details Army career as four-star general (11/11/13)
The path to becoming a four-star general in the U.S. Army is fraught with difficulty, but Jackson native Louis C. Wagner Jr. said his achievement of the rank came down to three things. "You have to work hard," Wagner said. "You also have to speak out when necessary; you just can't blindly follow orders. A little bit of luck also helps."...
Scott City veteran looks back on time in Vietnam (11/11/13)
Larry Corn, a resident of Scott City and a Vietnam veteran, would be the first to say his wartime experiences aren't anything to brag about. "There were men over there who did a lot more than I did," said Corn, 66. Corn, a Sikeston, Mo., native who served in Vietnam from 1968 to 1969 while in the U.S. ...
WWII reunions poignant for dwindling veterans (11/11/13)
DAYTON, Ohio -- Paul Young rarely talked about his service during World War II -- about the B-25 bomber he piloted, about his 57 missions, about the dangers he faced or the fears he overcame. "Some things you just don't talk about," he said...
For baby boomers, JFK's assassination ripples still (11/10/13)
We cannot get past it, we Americans. Not a half century later. Maybe not even ever. The president with the easy grin in whom so much hope was invested. His wife, forever frozen in pink and pillbox hat. The motorcade. The sunny day. The shadowy man in the window with a rifle. ...
Aviator's Purple Heart returned (11/10/13)
Gordon H. Yates was a tall, skinny redhead who joined the Navy during World War II when he was 17. Two years later, the young aviator was dead, beheaded by the enemy after his patrol bomber was shot down in waters off southeast Asia. On Saturday, Purple Hearts Reunited presented the medal he was awarded decades ago to his sister in southeastern Pennsylvania. Yates' family had lost track of the medal at least as far back as 1979 when his father died...
WWII's Doolittle Raiders make a final toast in Ohio (11/10/13)
DAYTON, Ohio -- The last of the Doolittle Raiders, all in their 90s, offered a final toast Saturday to their fallen comrades, as they pondered their place in history after a day of fanfare about their 1942 attack on Japan. "May they rest in peace," Lt. ...
Safety concerns prompted repairs to Esquire Theater (11/07/13)
The Esquire Theater has undergone repairs over the last few weeks -- the most visible work anyone has seen on the aging building since renovation plans for the theater fell through last year. David Suntrup on Wednesday said his home repair and restoration business is under contract with the building's owner, Phil Brinson, to repair the front of the building at 824 Broadway and its facade to eliminate hazard the building poses to pedestrians and to make the building "more acceptable to the eye.". ...
Homesick hijacker returns to U.S. after 30 years in Cuba (11/07/13)
MIAMI -- An American who hijacked an airliner to Cuba nearly 30 years ago as a self-described revolutionary flew back home Wednesday to face U.S. justice. FBI agents took William Potts, 56, into custody shortly after his charter flight from Havana landed at Miami International Airport, said FBI spokesman Mike Leverock. Potts faces a 1985 federal indictment charging him with air piracy for hijacking a Piedmont Airlines flight in 1984...
Art hoard held unknown masterworks (11/06/13)
AUGSBURG, Germany -- It started with a routine check by German tax inspectors -- and resulted in the discovery of an art hoard so vast and spectacular that no one yet knows how the story ends. On a high-speed train from Zurich to Munich on Sept. ...
Walter Cronkite memorial opens in St. Joseph (11/04/13)
ST. JOSEPH, Mo. -- A memorial to the late television news legend Walter Cronkite opens this week in the northwest Missouri city where he was born. Missouri Western State University in St. Joseph is planning an unveiling event today on what would have been the newsman's 97th birthday. Gov. Jay Nixon and Cronkite's cousin, former Kansas City Mayor Kay Barnes, will be on campus...
Gathering black walnuts stays an Ozarks tradition (11/03/13)
GOODWIN, Mo. -- Terry Crocker's mother, Jearldean Shelton, was proud of her black walnut trees. Every fall, as a child, Terry would collect the green globes off the ground for her mom, spread the nuts on the driveway and crack them open with a hammer...
1949 exorcism continues to fascinate St. Louis (10/31/13)
ST. LOUIS -- Saint Louis University junior Zach Grummer-Strawn has never seen "The Exorcist," the 1973 horror film considered one of the finest examples of unadulterated cinematic terror. He's only vaguely familiar with the monthlong 1949 demon-purging ritual at his school that inspired William Peter Blatty's novel and later the movie...
For Skelton, U.S. military was his mission (10/30/13)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- Though he never served in the U.S. military, Ike Skelton became one of its strongest assets. The former Missouri congressman was being remembered Tuesday for a 34-year career in Congress that spanned a dozen military conflicts, and for taking pride in fighting for better training, staffing, equipment, housing, salary and benefits for the men and women of the U.S. armed forces. Skelton died Monday in a Virginia hospital at age 81...
Dutch museums find 139 likely Nazi-looted artworks (10/30/13)
AMSTERDAM -- A major investigation into whether art hanging in Dutch museums may have once been Nazi loot has yielded an unexpectedly large result: 139 suspect works, including ones by masters like Matisse, Klee and Kandinsky. The announcement Tuesday by the museums raises the question of why it has taken them nearly 70 years to examine their collections in a systematic way after World War II -- and suggests that more looted art may emerge from other countries that haven't done so...
Ellis Island reopens for first time after Sandy's floods (10/29/13)
NEW YORK -- The island that ushered millions of immigrants into the United States and became a monument to its mosaic of ancestries reopened to visitors Monday for the first time since superstorm Sandy, adding a chapter to the narrative of hard-won recovery on the eve of the storm's anniversary...
Lou Reed, iconic rock poet, dead at 71 (10/28/13)
NEW YORK -- Lou Reed was a pioneer for countless bands who didn't worry about their next hit single. Reed, who died Sunday at age 71, challenged rock's founding promise of good times and public celebration. As leader of the Velvet Underground and as a solo artist, he was the father of indie rock, and an ancestor of punk, New Wave and the alternative rock movements of the 1970s, '80s and beyond...
1999 grand jury recommended indictment of JonBenet's parents (10/27/13)
BOULDER, Colo. -- A grand jury found enough evidence to indict the parents of JonBenet Ramsey for child abuse and accessory to first-degree murder in the 6-year-old's death, newly unsealed documents revealed Friday, nearly a decade after DNA evidence cleared the couple...
St. James AME nominated for inclusion in National Register (10/25/13)
St. James AME Church, 516 North St. in Cape Girardeau, is one of 12 nominees to be considered for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, according to a news release from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. The Missouri Advisory Council on Historic Preservation will consider nominations for the National Register at 9 a.m. Nov. 8 at the Lewis and Clark State Office Building in Jefferson City, Mo. The quarterly meeting is open to the public...
Face-lift unveiled for Academic Hall (10/25/13)
A refurbished Academic Hall, Southeast Missouri State University's iconic landmark, reopened Thursday with a nod to the past while looking to the future. About 700 people attended the grand reopening and ribbon-cutting for the famously copper-domed landmark, which had been closed for two years as it underwent $23.9 million in renovations...
Reporter recalls Marine barracks blast 30 years on (10/24/13)
It had been a massive, four-story building that had withstood airstrikes and artillery -- now reduced to a mountain of rubble. Enormous chunks of concrete, their twisted steel reinforcements ripped bare, balanced precariously on piles of debris. Only cracked concrete frames on the ground floor bore any semblance to what had stood there before...
Wal-Mart employee recalls WWII service (10/21/13)
JOPLIN, Mo. -- Each day, the interrogation would play out the same way. His German captors would enter the room and ask Keith Fiscus questions about American troop numbers and movements, The Joplin Globe reported. And each day, Fiscus would repeat the same answer: his name, his rank and his serial number. Nothing more...
In life and in death, JFK changed television (10/20/13)
NEW YORK -- It's a measure of how long ago President John F. Kennedy died that, at the time, television was described as a young medium. With the shooting in Dallas, TV grew up. Coverage that November weekend 50 years ago signaled, at last, that television could fulfill its grand promise. ...
Former House speaker Tom Foley dies at age 84 (10/20/13)
SPOKANE, Wash. -- Tom Foley was born in 1929, the year of the great stock market crash, and grew up in Spokane during World War II. These experiences shaped his viewpoint during a long political career, which culminated with him becoming the first Speaker of the House to hail from west of the Rocky Mountains...
1.8 million-year-old skull gives glimpse of evolution (10/18/13)
DMANISI, Georgia -- The discovery of a 1.8-million-year-old skull of a human ancestor buried under a medieval Georgian village provides a vivid picture of early evolution and indicates our family tree may have fewer branches than some believe, scientists say...
Historic churches damaged by quake (10/17/13)
LOON, Philippines -- The earthquake that struck the central Philippines and killed at least 144 people dealt a serious blow to the region's historical and religious legacy by heavily damaging a dozen or more churches, some of them hundreds of years old...
Academic Hall to open during Homecoming (10/15/13)
After two years of renovation, Southeast Missouri State University's Academic Hall, the building famous for its copper dome, will reopen its door's during next week's Homecoming festivities. Homecoming week, set for Oct. 21-26, will include the rededication ceremony for Academic Hall and tours of the facility. ...
Claims US never defaulted on debt fall short (10/15/13)
WASHINGTON -- You hear a perfect record cited over and over in the debt limit debate: The United States has never defaulted. Better put an asterisk by that. America has briefly stiffed some of its creditors on at least two occasions. Once, the young nation had a dramatic excuse: The Treasury was empty, the White House and Capitol were charred ruins, even the troops fighting the War of 1812 weren't getting paid...
Police make arrest in 'Baby Hope' case (10/13/13)
NEW YORK -- Police announced Saturday that, after an investigation that lasted more than two decades, they had arrested the killer of a child who was nicknamed Baby Hope by detectives after her body was discovered inside a picnic cooler beside a Manhattan highway in 1991...
Time may be running out for 19th-century cabin in Cape (10/11/13)
An 1800s-era log cabin hidden beneath a wood-siding house on a Cape Girardeau street may be nearing the end of its life, despite the efforts of a preservationist and retired contractor. Jim Blakemore said he is not ready to give up on the house at 1818 N. Fountain St., but he worries the city, which holds the permission slip for how much longer it can stand, may be...
Chaffee strives to move to 7-0 on the season (10/09/13)
To find the secret of an unusual, eerily similar season in the history of Red Devils football, one may want to check an old Chaffee football roster and the streets of the town Friday night. For whom and what? Later. Why? Because for Charlie Vickery, his former teammates and many in Chaffee, Friday's game against Malden is a blip on the space-time continuum, the recreation of a narrative that played out for a previous generation of Red Devils...
Police: Mother of 'Baby Hope' identified (10/09/13)
NEW YORK -- In a dramatic break in a cold case more than two decades old, investigators used DNA to identify the mother of a dead child known only as Baby Hope, police said Tuesday. The New York Police Department received a tip from someone after a publicity push over the summer, police officials said...
Fond memories from working at the Southeast Missourian (10/04/13)
Editor's note: The following guest column is part of a letter the writer sent to Southeast Missourian publisher Jon K. Rust. By John Bennet I am writing to let you know how much I enjoy the online version of the Southeast Missourian. As a Missouri expatriate living in the overly open-minded Pacific Northwest, it is absolutely refreshing to read about God's Country and its denizens...
Bank donates building to Marble Hill for new city hall (10/04/13)
The Bank of Missouri last week donated the former Security Bank building to Marble Hill for use as a new city hall. According to a news release issued by The Bank of Missouri, as a condition of the donation, Marble Hill will transfer its city hall facilities to Bollinger County. Once that move is made, the University of Missouri Extension and the Bollinger County Archives will move into the current city hall building...
University archives obtains letter from Faulkner ancestor (10/04/13)
Special Collections and Archives at Kent Library at Southeast Missouri State University has acquired a letter written by an ancestor of Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner. Roxanne Dunn, assistant in the special collections and archives at Kent Library and graduate assistant A.J. Medlock obtained the letter from Ste. Genevieve, Mo., resident Pat Parker. Medlock met Parker through a Civil War digitalization project called "Crossroads and Confluence."...
Cape Girardeau man presented with diploma after 60 years (09/29/13)
Every five years, Dean Percival of Cape Girardeau attends the class of 1953 school reunions of Axtell, Kan. But Percival has never felt like a bona fide class member, because he didn't graduate with his peers and lacked a diploma...
Mildred Reynolds has served 70 years at the keyboard in Whitewater (09/29/13)
WHITEWATER -- When United Methodist Church pianist Mildred Reynolds places her hands on the keys and strikes the first chords of a song, she doesn't just play notes, she makes moving hymnal music with a strong tempo that reminds you, even without the words, what the music is about...
Archive partnership formed for Southwest Missouri records (09/27/13)
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -- Missouri State University is working with the secretary of state's office to preserve historic records from the southwestern part of the state. The partnership calls for staff from the Missouri State Archives to work with college students to clean, repair, arrange and index local government records from the 1800s...
Rare Stones pics at rock hall (09/27/13)
NEW YORK -- Rare photos of the young Rolling Stones, taken by their tour manager during their first years in the United States, will be unveiled at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next month. Bob Bonis was the group's tour manager from 1964 to 1966. The photos show a range of their activities, from shows to hanging out. One photo shows Keith Richards cutting Charlie Watts' hair...
'Yellow brick road' may lead to pirate booty (09/26/13)
BREWSTER, Mass. -- He calls it "the yellow brick road" because it's literally sprinkled with gold dust. This road runs along Cape Cod's shifting seafloor, and undersea explorer Barry Clifford believes it leads to undiscovered treasure from the wreck of the pirate ship Whydah...
99-year-old Iowa woman gets high school diploma (09/25/13)
WATERLOO, Iowa -- A 99-year-old Iowa woman who dropped out of a high school more than 80 years ago despite needing only one credit to graduate has finally received her diploma. Audrey Crabtree of Cedar Falls, Iowa, smiled Monday as she received an honorary diploma for her time at Waterloo East High School...
Miss Piggy joins Kermit in Smithsonian collection (09/25/13)
WASHINGTON -- Miss Piggy is finally joining her love, Kermit the Frog, in the Smithsonian Institution's collection of Jim Henson's Muppets, and Bert and Ernie will have a place in history, too. Henson's family, including his daughter, Cheryl Henson, donated more than 20 puppets and props Tuesday to the National Museum of American History to accompany the earlier donations of Kermit, Oscar the Grouch and early Henson creations...
WWII soldier's letter finally reaches daughter (09/24/13)
RENO, Nev. (AP) -- A World War II soldier's heartfelt letter to his daughter has finally reached her, seven decades after it was written. Peggy Eddington-Smith received the letter penned by her father, Pfc. John Eddington, as well as his Bronze Star and Purple Heart medals, during an emotional ceremony Saturday in Dayton, Nev., about 40 miles southeast of Reno...
Missouri woman might learn mother's fate after 44 years (09/23/13)
JOPLIN, Mo. -- A Joplin woman believes her mother may be among six people whose bodies were found in two rusty cars at the bottom of an Oklahoma lake. The Joplin Globe reported that Jo Irick became worried in the spring of 1969 when the letter she sent to her mother, Nora Duncan, came back unopened. ...
7 decades later, Purple Heart given to daughter (09/20/13)
ST. LOUIS (AP) -- Pfc. John Eddington was preparing for deployment to Europe in World War II when he learned his wife gave birth to a daughter. He penned a letter, sweetly telling the little girl how much he loved her and longed to see her. But he never got to meet her, and the letter and his Purple Heart medal ended up in a box thousands of miles away from Peggy Smith, the daughter who was told nearly nothing about him...
Submerged cars may solve cold cases (09/19/13)
SAYRE, Okla. -- When three teenagers from this small Oklahoma town disappeared on their way to a high-school football game in 1970, rumors swirled as to what happened to the trio. Some thought the three had stumbled across a drug deal at a rural airstrip and been killed. Others said they might have run away to California...
Alabama memorial service marks 50th anniversary of bombing (09/16/13)
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- Hundreds of people black and white, many holding hands on Sunday filled an Alabama church that was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan 50 years ago to mark the anniversary of the blast that killed four little girls and became a landmark moment in the civil rights struggle...
Section of Broadway named to National Historic Register (09/15/13)
The National Register of Historic Places got a little larger this month when it added to its listings the south side of the 400 block of Broadway. The newest listing, made official Sept. 4, enlarges the boundary of the National Register's Broadway-Middle Commercial Historic District, which previously included the 500 block of Broadway and the 100 block of North Middle Street...
Reagan's text offers insight into policy and humor (09/14/13)
Twenty-five years ago -- Sept. 14, 1988 -- President Ronald Reagan visited Cape Girardeau. A transcript of the speech he gave from a stage at the Show Me Center is printed below. Thank you all very much, Sen. Jack Danforth, Sen. Kit Bond, and your great Congressman, one of the finest, Bill Emerson, and JoAnn. ...
Funeral held for Conn. slave who died in 1798 (09/13/13)
WATERBURY, Conn. -- A slave who died more than 200 years ago in Connecticut but was never buried was given a funeral Thursday that included lying in state at the state Capitol and calls for learning from his painful life. The enslaved man known as Mr. Fortune was buried in a cemetery filled with prominent citizens after a service at the Waterbury church where he had been baptized. Earlier in the day, his remains lay in state in the Capitol rotunda in Hartford...
1640 book to be displayed Friday in St. Louis (09/10/13)
ST. LOUIS -- A book of Puritan psalms produced in 1640 will be on display in St. Louis on Friday before it goes on sale at an auction, where it is expected to sell for millions of dollars. The Bay Psalm Book was the first book made in what would become the United States and only 11 copies of it still exist, The St. ...
New Van Gogh piece found in Norwegian attic (09/10/13)
AMSTERDAM (AP) -- A painting that sat for six decades in a Norwegian industrialist's attic after he was told it was a fake Van Gogh was pronounced the real thing Monday, making it the first full-size canvas by the tortured Dutch artist to be discovered since 1928...
Veteran ranger, at 81, on verge of retirement (09/08/13)
WAPPAPELLO, Mo. -- The dedication of Wappapello Dam in July 1941 drew a large crowd, at least to 9-year-old Ira Tucker. His family drove over from Puxico, Mo., on the hot day, cutting across gravel roads and a few fields, the way locals did then, when roads to the dam were rough and few...
Hitler bodyguard Rochus Misch dies at 96 (09/06/13)
BERLIN (AP) -- Rochus Misch, who served as Adolf Hitler's devoted bodyguard for most of World War II and was the last remaining witness to the Nazi leader's final hours in his Berlin bunker, has died. He was 96. Misch died Thursday in Berlin after a short illness, Burkhard Nachtigall, who helped him ghostwrite his 2008 memoir, told The Associated Press in an email on Friday...
Fort D Day offers step back in time (09/03/13)
Holding his 1861 rifled musket -- barrel up -- Joe Roberts of Scott City goes through the steps of firing the gun for a small crowd of spectators at Monday's Fort D Day. Roberts was just one of several re-enactors from the Turner Brigade Association, who put on three events on major summer holidays, such as Memorial Day, Fourth of July and Labor Day, at the historic site. ...
Germany tries 92-year-old former Nazi for war crime (09/03/13)
HAGEN, Germany -- Germany put a 92-year-old former member of the Nazi Waffen SS on trial Monday on charges that he killed a Dutch resistance fighter in 1944. Dutch-born Siert Bruins, who is now German, entered the Hagen state courtroom using a walker, but appeared alert and attentive as the proceedings opened...
Cape church marks anniversary of MLK's speech (08/29/13)
Pews were filled at the St. James AME church in Cape Girardeau Wednesday night to celebrate the love, life and legacy of "the drum major of justice," Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The celebration, sponsored by the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Citywide Celebration Committee, honored the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and King's "I Have a Dream" speech...
Missouri seeks owners of abandoned military medals (08/29/13)
ST. LOUIS -- Some are forgotten in the postwar fog, others lost to the passage of time or shifting circumstances. Now, in the age of instant communication, the hope is that military honors earned fighting in foreign lands will wind up where they belong...
Washington remembers King's dream (08/29/13)
WASHINGTON -- Taking stock of progress made and still to come, Americans of all backgrounds and colors massed on the National Mall on Wednesday to hear President Barack Obama and civil rights pioneers commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech on the same spot where he gave unforgettable voice to the struggle for racial equality 50 years earlier...
More than 300 sites ring bells for MLK (08/29/13)
WASHINGTON -- Church bells were ringing out Wednesday at the National Cathedral and nationwide to answer a call from one of the most important civil rights speeches in history to "let freedom ring." Organizers said people at more than 300 sites in nearly every state were ringing their bells to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr.'s Aug. 28, 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech...
Youth see march anniversary as a chance to lead (08/26/13)
WASHINGTON -- Mary-Pat Hector of Atlanta was operating much like a 1960s civil rights activist as she laid plans for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. She was constantly on the phone as she confirmed event details, tweaked the draft of the speech she gave at Saturday's rally at the Lincoln Memorial and prepared for a presentation...
Marching for King's dream: 'Task is not done' (08/25/13)
WASHINGTON -- Tens of thousands of people marched to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and down the National Mall on Saturday, commemorating the 50th anniversary of King's famous speech and pledging his dream includes equality for gays, Latinos, the poor and the disabled...
Cape Girardeau church to mark March on Washington anniversary (08/25/13)
A Cape Girardeau church will mark a pivotal date in the American civil rights struggle next week. The 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech will be observed at 7 p.m. Wednesday at St. James AME Church, 516 North St...
50 years after King, marchers gather again in DC (08/23/13)
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Next week, the nation's first black president, a living symbol of the racial progress Martin Luther King Jr. dreamed about, will stand near the spot where King stood 50 years ago and say where he believes this nation should be headed...
Skull parts, headstone found near Jefferson City (08/23/13)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Authorities are trying to determine the origins and identities of a skull, a partial skull and an incomplete headstone found along a creek bed in southern Callaway County. A person walking along Old Highway 94 on Sunday found the bones and partial headstone on a private farm, Dennis Crane said Wednesday. The sheriff doesn't believe the remains are from a recent murder or missing person's case, The Jefferson City News-Tribune reported (http://bit.ly/185AwSI )...
Nixon tapes span Watergate, Soviet summit (08/22/13)
YORBA LINDA, Calif. (AP) -- In the hours after President Richard Nixon delivered his first major national address about Watergate, two future presidents called him to express their private support, according to audio recordings released Wednesday...
Kansas sculptor Jim Brothers dies at 72 (08/22/13)
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) -- A Kansas artist whose bronze sculptures are on display in the nation's capital and at historical monuments around the country has died. He was 72. Jim Brothers died Tuesday at his home in Lawrence. A funeral director at Warren McElwain Mortuary in Lawrence says Brothers had been receiving hospice care...
Best-selling novelist Elmore Leonard, author of 'Killshot,' dies at 87 (08/21/13)
DETROIT -- He was the master of his genre, the Dickens of Detroit, the Chaucer of Crime. Pretty much every novel Elmore Leonard wrote from the mid-1980s on was a best-seller, and every fan of crime stories knew his name. George Clooney was an admirer. So were Quentin Tarantino, Saul Bellow, Stephen King and millions of ordinary readers...
Cellphone tower, business park rezoning approved (08/20/13)
A much-debated special-use permit for a 140-foot cellphone tower to be built in downtown Cape Girardeau will be granted to AT&T, the city council decided Monday. The council decided in favor of the issue as part of its consent agenda. Before the approval, several people spoke in favor of the cellphone tower, but no one, as they had at past meetings, spoke in opposition. ...
5 decades later, some JFK probe files still sealed (08/19/13)
Five decades after President John F. Kennedy was fatally shot and long after official inquiries ended, thousands of pages of investigative documents remain withheld from public view. The contents of these files are partially known -- and intriguing -- and conspiracy buffs are not the only ones seeking to open them for a closer look...