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Occupy protests move to foreclosed homes

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

(Photo)
Deb Austin, right, who has received an eviction notice, stands in front of her house Tuesday along with other homeowners, neighbors and demonstrators in Portland, Ore. Following tactics by Occupy Wall Street, demonstrators across the country are staging Occupy Homes actions to try to stop foreclosures.
(Don Ryan ~ Associated Press)
SEATTLE -- The Occupy Wall Street protests are moving into the neighborhood.

Finding it increasingly difficult to camp in public spaces, Occupy protesters across the country are reclaiming foreclosed homes and boarded-up properties, signaling a tactical shift for the movement against wealth inequality. Groups in more than 25 cities held protests Tuesday on behalf of homeowners facing evictions.

In Atlanta, protesters held a rally at a county courthouse and used whistles and sirens to disrupt an auction of seized houses. In New York, they marched through a residential neighborhood in Brooklyn carrying signs that read "Foreclose on banks, not people." Los Angeles protesters rallied around a family of five who plans to reclaim the home they lost six months ago in foreclosure.

"It's pretty clear that the fight is against the banks, and the Occupy movement is about occupying spaces. So occupying a space that should belong to homeowners but belongs to the banks seems like the logical next step for the Occupy movement," said Jeff Ordower, one of the organizers of Occupy Homes.

The events reflect the protesters' lingering frustration over the housing crisis that has sent millions of homes into foreclosure after the burst of the housing bubble that helped cripple the country's economy. Nearly a quarter of all U.S. homeowners with mortgages are now underwater, representing nearly 11 million homes, according to CoreLogic, a real estate research firm.

Protesters say that banks and financial firms own abandoned foreclosed houses that could be housing people.

Seattle has become a leader in the anti-foreclosure movement as protesters took over a formerly boarded-up duplex last month. They painted the bare wood sidings with green, black and red paint, and strung up a banner that says "Occupy Everything -- No Banks No Landlords."

While arrests have already been made in a couple of squatting cases in Seattle and Portland, it remains to be seen how authorities will react to this latest tactic.

In Portland, police spokesman Sgt. Pete Simpson said he's aware that the movement called for people to occupy foreclosed homes, but said it's difficult to distinguish between the people who would squat in homes as a political statement and those that do it for shelter.

"The vacant property issue is of concern in cities nationwide," Simpson said. "We'll treat them all as trespassers."

In Seattle, protesters took over a boarded-up warehouse slated for demolition last weekend. In an announcement, the protesters said they planned to make the warehouse into a community center, and hosted a party the night they opened the building. Police moved in soon after, arresting 16 people in the process of clearing it out.

Seattle police spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb said his department sees squatting in private properties as the same violation of trespassing Occupy Seattle made when it camped in a downtown park.

"It's no different than when people were trespassing (in the park)," Whitcomb said. "We went nights and days, letting people camp in the park. We relied on education and outreach, rather than enforcing the law to the letter."

Atlanta protesters took a more aggressive approach in trying to disrupt the home auction. The auction went on but the whistles and sirens made it difficult for the auctioneers to communicate, said Occupy Atlanta spokesman Tim Franzen.

"We don't know how many homes we saved for one more month during the holiday season," he said. "It was kind of a Christmas gift to the people."

In Los Angeles, protest organizers were keeping the full identity of the man who is going to take back his home secret to not alert police or the bank. The protesters planned to rally when the family returns to their home.

New York protesters introduced members of a homeless family at the end of their rally and said they plan renovate and clean up the house so the family can live in a house they said had been abandoned by a bank.

In Portland, a news conference was held at the home of a woman facing foreclosure next March. She vowed to stay in her house until authorities take her out.

"We belong here," said Deb Austin, who said she fell behind in payments after a cancer diagnosis and after her husband lost her second job. "And we're not leaving."


Associated Press writers Nigel Duara in Portland, Ore., Cristina Silva in Las Vegas, Leonard Pallats in Atlanta, and Christina Hoag in Los Angeles contributed to this report.


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-- Posted by eldonacton on Wed, Dec 7, 2011, at 1:09 AM


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