World briefs 5/22/03

Source of Canada's mad cow case sought

TORONTO -- Prime Minister Jean Chretien ate a high-profile steak lunch Wednesday, trying to reassure the world that Canadian beef is safe after North America's first case of mad cow disease in a decade was discovered in a herd in Alberta.

Fearing harm to the beef industry, a mainstay in Alberta and a significant sector of Canada's economy, government and industry figures sought to stem concerns of a wider outbreak.

"If it is one herd, it's not the same thing than if it is spread," Chretien said in his first comments on the issue Wednesday. "So we hope and we pray, we have all indication that it is one cow in one herd."

U.S. troops shoot Afghan soldiers outside embassy

KABUL, Afghanistan -- In a rare confrontation between U.S. forces and their Afghan allies, U.S. Marines guarding the American Embassy exchanged fire Wednesday with Afghan troops. Four Afghans were killed.

Afghan officials called the shooting "a misunderstanding," saying jittery Marines opened fire believing they'd come under attack. The U.S. Embassy said only that the loss of life was regrettable and an inquiry was under way.

The shooting came a day after the United States raised its terror alert level, warning of possible attacks on Americans worldwide.

Kabul Police Chief Basir Salangi said he believed Afghan soldiers were transferring weapons to an intelligence agency compound across the street from the embassy when American soldiers opened fire in the belief they were about to be attacked.

Israel called on to stop invading Palestinian towns

JERUSALEM -- Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas called on Israel to stop invading Palestinian-controlled areas, saying Wednesday that it "deepens the hatred between the two peoples."

Israeli Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom said Wednesday that if Abbas, known as Abu Mazen, did not begin working to end terror attacks against Israel, he would wind up like Yasser Arafat, whom Israel is trying to marginalize.

"Abu Mazen's fate is in his own hands," Shalom said.

President Bush called Sharon and Abbas on Tuesday, urging both sides to take steps to end the violence and resume talks.

Archaeologists find six bodies at Stonehenge

LONDON -- Archaeologists who last year unearthed the remains of a Bronze Age archer at Stonehenge said Wednesday they have found six more bodies near the mysterious ring of ancient monoliths.

The remains of four adults and two children were found about half a mile from that of the archer, dubbed "The King of Stonehenge" by Britain's tabloid press. Archaeologists said he came from Switzerland and may have been involved in building the monument.

Radiocarbon tests will be done to find out more precise dates for the burials but the group is believed to have lived around 2300 B.C., during the building of Stonehenge at Amesbury, 75 miles southwest of London.

Chirac: G-8 nations must put tensions aside

PARIS -- The French president, seeking to put aside disputes over Iraq, appealed Wednesday to world leaders to regroup around a shared and vital objective: kickstarting the global economy.

"All the conditions have now come together for an economic rebound. We must not miss this turning point," President Jacques Chirac said in a speech laying out his hopes for the June 1-3 Group of Eight meeting in the Alpine spa town of Evian.

The meeting, which will bring President Bush together with world leaders who opposed his military campaign that ousted Saddam Hussein, offers an opportunity for reconciliation, said Chirac, who led European resistance to the war.

-- From wire reports

Source of Canada's mad cow case sought

TORONTO -- Prime Minister Jean Chretien ate a high-profile steak lunch Wednesday, trying to reassure the world that Canadian beef is safe after North America's first case of mad cow disease in a decade was discovered in a herd in Alberta.

Fearing harm to the beef industry, a mainstay in Alberta and a significant sector of Canada's economy, government and industry figures sought to stem concerns of a wider outbreak.

"If it is one herd, it's not the same thing than if it is spread," Chretien said in his first comments on the issue Wednesday. "So we hope and we pray, we have all indication that it is one cow in one herd."

U.S. troops shoot Afghan soldiers outside embassy

KABUL, Afghanistan -- In a rare confrontation between U.S. forces and their Afghan allies, U.S. Marines guarding the American Embassy exchanged fire Wednesday with Afghan troops. Four Afghans were killed.

Afghan officials called the shooting "a misunderstanding," saying jittery Marines opened fire believing they'd come under attack. The U.S. Embassy said only that the loss of life was regrettable and an inquiry was under way.

The shooting came a day after the United States raised its terror alert level, warning of possible attacks on Americans worldwide.

Kabul Police Chief Basir Salangi said he believed Afghan soldiers were transferring weapons to an intelligence agency compound across the street from the embassy when American soldiers opened fire in the belief they were about to be attacked.

Israel called on to stop invading Palestinian towns

JERUSALEM -- Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas called on Israel to stop invading Palestinian-controlled areas, saying Wednesday that it "deepens the hatred between the two peoples."

Israeli Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom said Wednesday that if Abbas, known as Abu Mazen, did not begin working to end terror attacks against Israel, he would wind up like Yasser Arafat, whom Israel is trying to marginalize.

"Abu Mazen's fate is in his own hands," Shalom said.

President Bush called Sharon and Abbas on Tuesday, urging both sides to take steps to end the violence and resume talks.

Archaeologists find six bodies at Stonehenge

LONDON -- Archaeologists who last year unearthed the remains of a Bronze Age archer at Stonehenge said Wednesday they have found six more bodies near the mysterious ring of ancient monoliths.

The remains of four adults and two children were found about half a mile from that of the archer, dubbed "The King of Stonehenge" by Britain's tabloid press. Archaeologists said he came from Switzerland and may have been involved in building the monument.

Radiocarbon tests will be done to find out more precise dates for the burials but the group is believed to have lived around 2300 B.C., during the building of Stonehenge at Amesbury, 75 miles southwest of London.

Chirac: G-8 nations must put tensions aside

PARIS -- The French president, seeking to put aside disputes over Iraq, appealed Wednesday to world leaders to regroup around a shared and vital objective: kickstarting the global economy.

"All the conditions have now come together for an economic rebound. We must not miss this turning point," President Jacques Chirac said in a speech laying out his hopes for the June 1-3 Group of Eight meeting in the Alpine spa town of Evian.

The meeting, which will bring President Bush together with world leaders who opposed his military campaign that ousted Saddam Hussein, offers an opportunity for reconciliation, said Chirac, who led European resistance to the war.

-- From wire reports

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