Key developments concerning Iraq

  • Iraq's civilian administrator said a national conference to choose an interim government probably won't be held until mid-July.

    U.S. officials looking for Iraq's weapons said some 20 percent of catalogued radioactive materials stored at Iraq's largest nuclear facility are unaccounted for following severe looting.

    At the United Nations, the United States has called for a vote Thursday on a U.N. resolution to let the U.S.-led coalition run Iraq until it has a recognized government and use the country's oil revenues for reconstruction.

    U.S. soldiers in northern Iraq patrolled the streets of Hawijeh to restore calm after a weekend of Arab-Kurdish violence left at least 11 people dead and a U.S. soldier wounded.

    Iraqi women are studying the Kurdish-controlled north to see how women there have improved their status in the male-dominated Muslim society.

    The World Health Organization says it has just a fraction of the money it needs to support Iraq's floundering hospitals. WHO is trying to collect $180 million to restore basic services like cleaning and trash disposal.

  • Iraq's civilian administrator said a national conference to choose an interim government probably won't be held until mid-July.

    U.S. officials looking for Iraq's weapons said some 20 percent of catalogued radioactive materials stored at Iraq's largest nuclear facility are unaccounted for following severe looting.

    At the United Nations, the United States has called for a vote Thursday on a U.N. resolution to let the U.S.-led coalition run Iraq until it has a recognized government and use the country's oil revenues for reconstruction.

    U.S. soldiers in northern Iraq patrolled the streets of Hawijeh to restore calm after a weekend of Arab-Kurdish violence left at least 11 people dead and a U.S. soldier wounded.

    Iraqi women are studying the Kurdish-controlled north to see how women there have improved their status in the male-dominated Muslim society.

    The World Health Organization says it has just a fraction of the money it needs to support Iraq's floundering hospitals. WHO is trying to collect $180 million to restore basic services like cleaning and trash disposal.

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