Speak Out: Missouri horse slaughter plant close to getting permit

Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Mon, Jul 8, 2013, at 1:19 PM:

Just read the following article and wondered what people thought of this.

http://www.ksdk.com/news/article/387292/3/Permit-near-for-Missouri-horse-slaught...

The following comment from the article confuses me... it appears that some of the same people consider it inhumane to dispose of an abandoned horse, at the same time condoning the killing of an unwanted and unborn child.

"The Humane Society of the United States and other opponents argue that slaughtering horses is inhumane and unnecessary."

Replies (14)

  • I am asking that you do everything in your power to prevent any horse slaughter plants from opening in Missouri. Horse Slaughter is a highly expensive proposition for taxpayers.

    Each plant will cost taxpayers $400,000.00, according to this press release. This issue crosses all party lines. Voters and politicians from all sides of the isle are against horse slaughter for a laundry list of reasons.

    Here is the press release:

    http://moran.house.gov/press-release/moran-statement-usda-decision-allowing-re-o...

    "According to the USDA, each horse slaughter facility...would cost U.S. taxpayers over $400,000 per year in operation costs."

    This is the worst economy since the Great Depression. In addition to the cost of the USDA inspecting plants, at a price tag of $400,000.00 per plant to U.S. taxpayers, the meat will not even be eaten in the U.S. Why should we, as American taxpayers, pay for these inspections?

    Additionally, we have to factor in the taxpayer expense of police officers who will likely be taking more reports on horse theft and making more investigations into horse theft.

    As a horse owner, the thought of horse theft and stolen horses ending up at slaughter concerns me greatly. I would hope that it would concern you, too. Many people think of their horses as family members.

    -- Posted by morgansinkc on Thu, Jul 18, 2013, at 10:33 PM
  • I am also against slaughter plants in the United States because horses in the U.S. are not raised for human consumption. As a grower of corn, wheat and soybeans, having the USDA inspect horse slaughter plants concerns me as well.

    Horses are our friends and companions (at least they are my friends and companions), and as such horses are treated with drugs like cats and dogs to a wide variety of vaccinations, bacterins, topical and oral treatments that are not approved for human consumption. We use gloves with topical treatments, because we don't want equine drugs touching our skin, let alone consuming them.

    It's not economical to raise horses for slaughter in the U.S., because it takes more money to raise a foal to maturity than the horse meat market is willing to pay. It's an economical losing proposition. Therefore, the USDA has no business inspecting a horse slaughter plant that by default will be receiving horses that are not fit for human consumption. The horses they will be receiving have not been raised drug-free for human consumption.

    As a grower of corn, wheat and soybeans, the USDA's reputation directly affects many. The European Union, which is where most of the horse meat would go, has a zero tolerance for Bute (Phenylbutazone) , which is routinely given to horses in the U.S. It is estimated that 90% of horses in the U.S. have been treated with this drug, not to mention all of the other drugs.

    There is no good way to test for all of these drugs on every horse destined for slaughter, which would need to be done, since they are not raised for human consumption in the U.S. Many tests would need to be run on each horse, and there is no way to do this in a timely fashion, especially given that the tests have to be run after the horse is dead, and that autopsies need to be performed within 24 hours. The owners of the proposed Gallatin, Missouri horse slaughter plant say they will have the University of Missouri test each horse. That would mean dead body parts would need to be shipped from Gallatin to Columbia, and the University of Missouri does not perform testing on the weekends.

    Most of the horses destined for slaughter are young or middle-aged, and in the prime of their lives. Two that have been rescued from slaughter have gone on and are now showing at the Morgan Grand National level.

    I would like to send you information on what New Jersey has done regarding horse slaughter in the hopes that you will take note and perhaps help Missouri to follow in their footsteps on this issue:

    http://www.oceancountysignal.com/2012/09/21/dancer-bill-banning-horse-meat-for-h...

    "The law prohibits anyone from knowingly slaughtering or selling a horse for human consumption."

    -- Posted by morgansinkc on Thu, Jul 18, 2013, at 10:33 PM
  • Please sign the petition to ban horse slaughter in the U.S.:

    http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/ban-horse-slaughter-now

    Here is another petition, this one to Stop Horse Slaughter Factory in Missouri:

    http://www.thepetitionsite.com/925/215/246/stop-horse-slaughter-factory-in-misso...

    -- Posted by morgansinkc on Thu, Jul 18, 2013, at 10:34 PM
  • "Why should we, as American taxpayers, pay for these inspections?"

    Because we have passed laws, as Americans, that require those inspections. That's sort of what government inspectors do. If you don't like paying for them, lobby to do away with the inspection requirement. But, keep in mind, that means your pork, poultry, beef, and turkey will also lose its "USDA inspected" stamp.

    The cost argument is ridiculous, and is just another circuitous argument used to prevent the lawful and logical export of meat for which Americans, by and large, have no palate.

    No one has yet explained to me why it is more humane to have the horses consumed by bugs and bacteria, or turned into dog food and glue, than to have it consumed by humans.

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 6:47 AM
  • We raise cattle for the milk they produce, but that doesn't stop us from eating them when they stop producing it. We also treat them with oral and topical treatments for various bovine infections and infestations.

    No, it probably is not economical to raise horses solely for consumption, but that should not prevent those who think they can from trying to do so. Nor does it make sense to permit good meat to go to waste just because a segment of the population doesn't approve. There are those who eat horse. Let them.

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 6:52 AM
  • -- Posted by .Rick* on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 10:57 AM

    Rick,

    You better check with Joe Dirte before exploring this subject a lot further. Joe got into all kinds of trouble for horsin around with his comments on the Kentucky incident. ;-)

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 11:05 AM
  • "According to police, Jones came back to the property on April 24 and was again seen touching the horse's genitals."

    Interesting. They cut them off routinely, but touching them is a crime?

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 11:15 AM
  • If as a kid growing up, one would have been afforded the luxury of gazing at a couple or horse's arses (or mules) all afternoon on a hot July or August day while performing farming duties, he should have lost all sexual interest in them. I might add, should he have been dumb and perverted enough to have any to begin with.

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 11:24 AM
  • "the Clovis civilization"

    Were they the civilization found dwelling at the junctions of major highways, or was that the cloverleaf civilization?

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 2:37 PM
  • Peachy Horse Roast:

    1 1/4 lb. horsemeat roast, wrapped in pork fat

    1 Tbsp. oil

    1 medium onion, minced

    2 Tbsp. lemon juice

    1 cup canned sliced peaches

    1/2 cup sliced fresh or preserved mangoes

    Salt and pepper to taste

    1 1/2 cup beef broth

    1/2 cup plain yogurt

    Preheat the oven to 350°F.

    In an ovenproof pot, brown the roast on all sides in oil.

    Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes. Remove roast.

    Deglaze with the lemon juice, add the peaches and mangoes and salt and pepper.

    Add the beef broth and bring to a boil. Return roast to pot.

    Cook in the oven, covered, at 350°F for 50 minutes, until tender.

    Remove the roast from the pot and keep warm.

    Add the yogurt to the cooking juice, stirring using the back of a spoon.

    Slice the roast and pour the sauce on the slices or present the whole roast on a service platter with the sauce in a gravy boat.

    If necessary, thicken the sauce with cornstarch diluted in a bit of cold water.

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 3:25 PM
  • Forelegs up front and hind legs in back makes for six legs, a much better value if you like leg roasts.

    -- Posted by Old John on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 11:47 PM
  • Yes, it is puzzling how you could conclude that the Humane Society is a bunch of pro-choicers, just because.

    -- Posted by Spaniard on Sat, Jul 20, 2013, at 6:25 PM

    Ike,

    You seem to stay confused. Is it because you want to be confused, therefore trying to make an issue of everything someone you do not agree with posts on Speak Out, or is it because your IQ level is about the same number as your shoe size? Just curious.

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Sat, Jul 20, 2013, at 6:39 PM
  • -- Posted by .Rick* on Fri, Jul 19, 2013, at 10:57 AM

    Rick,

    You better check with Joe Dirte before exploring this subject a lot further. Joe got into all kinds of trouble for horsin around with his comments on the Kentucky incident. ;-)

    .

    Wheels, I guess whoever I "offended" with the kentucky horse posting has no problem with a Missouri horse being violated:)

    -- Posted by Joe Dirte on Mon, Jul 22, 2013, at 1:57 PM
  • Please sign the petition to ban horse slaughter in the U.S.:

    http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/ban-hor...

    Here is another petition, this one to Stop Horse Slaughter Factory in Missouri:

    http://www.thepetitionsite.com/925/215/2...

    -- Posted by morgansinkc on Thu, Jul 18, 2013, at 10:34 PM

    .

    .

    .

    If Mister Ed had a son, he would look like one of those slaughtered horses.

    -- Posted by Joe Dirte on Mon, Jul 22, 2013, at 2:14 PM

Respond to this thread

Posting a comment requires free registration: