Speak Out: Party like it's 1773! More on Palin Derangement Syndrome.

Posted by Shapley Hunter on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 11:08 AM:

http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/palin-party-like-its-1773/

At a T.E.A. Party Rally, Sarah Palin said that we shouldn't "Party Like It's 1773" yet, since there is lots of work to be done.

Several left-leaning commentators, most notably Markos Moulitsas and Gwen Ifil, mocked her for being an idiot, thinking she meant 1776. Apparently they were unaware that the original Boston Tea Party took place in 1773.

http://perfunction.typepad.com/perfunction/2010/10/historic-illiteracy-idiot-sar...

I've pointed out several times that Ms. Palin was correct, and then Senator, now (embarrassingly) Vice-President Biden was wrong, on the roll of the Vice President in the Senate. Even so many, including a number of posters here on the board, continue to perpetuate the myth that Ms. Palin got it wrong.

Replies (38)

  • Zzzz... Palin is still questionable at best even being correct in this case.

    -- Posted by almighty on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 11:41 AM
  • Is this the same Palin idiot who thought the U.S. has 50 states despite the fact that Yale educated obama informed us we have 58?

    -- Posted by FreedomFadingFast on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 12:02 PM
  • Spaniard- why do you care? This isn't your country.

    funny DTower

    -- Posted by Skeptic1 on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 12:11 PM
  • Spaniard wrote:

    "Not authorized to debate or introduce legislation. No authority over the senate calendar or senate rules (rule making is left to the senate to address per the constitution), specific and narrowly defined constitutional roles, which are largely ceremonial in nature. I suppose the VP could "preside" over the senate and choose who gets to speak and for how long but that is a power that hasn't been exercised much at all, especially in the last 100 years or so."

    As President of the Senate, the Vice President is a part of the Senate and thus can exercise a hand in making the rules. The fact that they haven't in over 100 years does not mean they can't.

    There are no 'largely ceremonial' roles outlined in the Constitution. The Vice President shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote except in the case of a tie. That's pretty cut and dried.

    Biden, however, said that the duties of the Vice President are defined as being a part of the Executive Branch, not the legisilative. That is flat out wrong. The duties of the Vice President aren't mentioned in Article II.

    From the Senate's website:

    "Vice-Presidential Duties:

    The framers also devoted scant attention to the vice president's duties, providing only that he "shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be evenly divided" (Article I, section 3). In practice, the number of times vice presidents have exercised this right has varied greatly. John Adams holds the record at 29 votes, followed closely by John C. Calhoun with 28. Since the 1870s, however, no vice president has cast as many as 10 tie-breaking votes. While vice presidents have used their votes chiefly on legislative issues, they have also broken ties on the election of Senate officers, as well as on the appointment of committees in 1881 when the parties were evenly represented in the Senate.

    The vice president's other constitutionally mandated duty was to receive from the states the tally of electoral ballots cast for president and vice president and to open the certificates "in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives," so that the total votes could be counted (Article II, section 1). Only a few happy vice presidents--John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Martin Van Buren, and George H.W. Bush--had the pleasure of announcing their own election as president. Many more were chagrined to announce the choice of a rival candidate for the office.

    Several framers ultimately refused to sign the Constitution, in part because they viewed the vice president's legislative role as a violation of the separation of powers doctrine. Elbridge Gerry, who would later serve as vice president, declared that the framers "might as well put the President himself as head of the legislature." Others thought the office unnecessary but agreed with Connecticut delegate Roger Sherman that "if the vice-President were not to be President of the Senate, he would be without employment, and some member [of the Senate, acting as presiding officer] must be deprived of his vote."

    The first two vice presidents, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, did much to shape the nature of the office and set many precedents. During most of the 19th century, the degree of influence and the role played within the Senate depended chiefly on the personality and inclinations of the individual involved. Some had great parliamentary skill and presided well, while others found the task boring, were incapable of maintaining order, or chose to spend most of their time away from Washington, leaving the duty to a president pro tempore. Some made an effort to preside fairly, while others used their position to promote the political agenda of the administration.

    During the 20th century, the role of the vice president has evolved into more of an executive branch position. Now, the vice president is usually seen as an integral part of a president's administration and presides over the Senate only on ceremonial occasions or when a tie-breaking vote may be needed. Yet, even though the nature of the job has changed, it is still greatly affected by the personality and skills of the individual incumbent."

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 12:26 PM
  • Is this the same Sarah Palin who endorsed John Raese for senator in Pennsylvania? Good move, Sarah, but Raese is not running in Pennsylvania, he is running in West Virginia. The woman cannot even read. A Fox News comentator, Liz Trotta (ring wing) called her inarticulate and uneducated. Now that's a right winger for you.

    -- Posted by howdydoody on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 12:56 PM
  • I thought it was the job of the Vice President to stick his foot in his mouth at every opportunity and at the same time embarass the current administration and our Country. In this case it goes to prove Sarah Palin was not qualified and we have the right man in that position.

    -- Posted by Mowrangler on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 1:01 PM
  • The libs are having problems dealing with rejection, we should not antagonize them.

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 1:06 PM
  • Did they let school out early today?

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 1:50 PM
  • I know you are having a hard time dealing with reality Theorist, but why did you single me out to pick on this morning? You aren't one of those stalkers are you?

    Maybe I won't have to be jealous of Rick after all! ☺ ☻ ☺ ☻

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 1:58 PM
  • Well Theorist, this make come as a terrible shock to you, but if you do not like my opinions, all I can say is..... That is truly unfortunate!

    I am entitled to my opinions if or not you like them. I do not care very much for you Socialistic Opinions and Philosophies either.

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 2:20 PM
  • Theorist,

    Am I safe in assuming that you have been unable to find evidence in which the liberals have, in fact, admitted that one of their programmes failed to achieve its stated purpose because it was a bad idea, rather than because it was 'underfunded'?

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 2:47 PM
  • Verstehen sie das?

    -- Posted by Theorist on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 2:07 PM

    Theoretiker

    Hast du nicht das? Verstehst du das?

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 3:38 PM
  • Ach du lieber! Das ist nicht gewertztraminer!

    -- Posted by Maynard on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 4:45 PM
  • Nein, es ist Asti Spumanti!

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 4:51 PM
  • Excuse me, folks, get your German right. Du is reserved for very personnel communication as between a very close friend, a family member. Sie is formal. I would never address Theorist as du.

    Of course, my German happened 55 years ago and senility is rapidly setting in.

    -- Posted by voyager on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 5:29 PM
  • Voyager,

    My German came from a translator on my so called smart phone. Otherwise I am lost in German.

    When Theorist wrote "Verstehen sie das?", that translated to.... Do they understand it?

    Is that correct?

    Naturally I had to answer.

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 6:11 PM
  • Ooh, that came through on my translator... loud and clear. ☺ ☺ ☺ ☺

    I cannot speak French either.

    -- Posted by Have_Wheels_Will_Travel on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 6:55 PM
  • :)

    -- Posted by Skeptic1 on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 7:22 PM
  • aw yeah....finally some fire~!...keep it up adidas!

    -- Posted by cadillacman on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 1:48 PM

    Im with ya Cadi,,,, Cat Fight!

    -- Posted by We Regret To Inform U on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 8:20 PM
  • Now y'all leave that toot little titten Theorist alone. She means well. She just doesn't know how to do it (like with most liberals, progressives, collectivists, socialists or whatever the Devil we need to call 'em these days).

    -- Posted by voyager on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 9:18 PM
  • Continue working on your German first, Theorist. We'll work on your English later.

    -- Posted by voyager on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 11:31 PM
  • Among the problems learning German were some of the jaw popping word cruncher constructions virtually unpronounceable by English speaking students.

    Ran into a good one a few days ago: Porsche Doppelkupplung which I would give a very loose translation being a double coupling configuration in their transmission allowing for automatic or manual shifting. No wonder the Porsche 911 Carrera S can set you back over $100,000 depending on options chosen. A mere pittance for one of the finest engineered sports cars in the world.

    -- Posted by voyager on Wed, Oct 20, 2010, at 11:54 PM
  • Theorist wrote:

    "Actually shapes...I am just waiting for you to admit you made a mistake."

    Where did I make one, in the past few days. I've admitted to several on this board in the past, but I'm not aware of any of late.

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 7:59 AM
  • Theorist....let me educate you. My screen name isn't a company. It is an acronym. It was a popular phrase used in the 80's. But of course you wouldn't know about popularity.

    All Day I Dream About ???

    -- Posted by Skeptic1 on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 8:15 AM
  • None of you posters get it, whether conservative or liberal. Palin's appeal can be summed up in two words: Eye Candy!

    -- Posted by Hugh M Bean on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 11:42 AM
  • According to Wikipedia:

    "The brothers split up in 1947,[11] with

    Rudi forming a new firm that he called Ruda -- from Rudolf Dassler, later rebranded Puma,

    and Adi forming a company formally registered as adidas AG (with lower case lettering) on 18 August 1949.

    The acronym All Day I Dream About Sport, although sometimes considered the origin of the adidas name, was applied retroactively, which makes it a backronym.

    The name is actually a portmanteau formed from "Adi" (a nickname for Adolf) and "Das" (from "Dassler")."

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 12:28 PM
  • Shapley-

    My screen name was never meant to be the shoe/sport company. My screen name was meant to be the funny acronym as my tribute to the 80's. But I guess you would of had to been a teenager in the 80's to know about it.

    In the 1980's adidas was used as an acronym to mean All Day I Dream About Sex. Tshirts were even made with this slogan (not the other adidas slogan) and was a favorite to wear. My t-shirt was a crop-shirt. Another thing you would of had to been a teenager in the 80's to know what that was!

    -- Posted by Skeptic1 on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 3:29 PM
  • I was a drunken sailor in the 80s.

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 3:44 PM
  • Well, okay, not always drunken...

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 3:44 PM
  • I remember my grandfather wearing a crop-shirt. He was a farmer...

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 4:03 PM
  • Excuse me, since we are clearing up a few things, will someone tell me what is a crop shirt? We were not farmers.

    -- Posted by voyager on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 4:14 PM
  • My grandfather's was a standard cotton-canvas shirt, biege in colour, that he wore when planting, cultivating, and harvesting crops. He also had crop-pants and crop-shoes, as distinguished from his Sunday go-to-meetin's, which were more formal.

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 4:23 PM
  • A crop-top, on the other hand, is a shirt that only extends down below the bust-line. We used to call them 'half-tees' or 'midriff' shirts.

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_KnUUnGjbeQI/R_VzTg87T0I/AAAAAAAAAVs/oxlXnjPad4k/s320/c...

    Women still wear them, but men wore them in the late '70s and in the '80s, mostly for athletics. That's the only other crop-clothing I'm familiar with...

    -- Posted by Shapley Hunter on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 4:27 PM
  • I was going to get onto you Spank, but your second statement smoothed it over!

    Yes- 1/2 t-shirts, croptops crop t's- all part of the 80's. The only thing I wish would come back from the 80's is my body.

    -- Posted by Skeptic1 on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 6:42 PM
  • Oh to have been a teenager in the 80's. Like Shapley, I was a drunken sailor and am still trying to fit that mold.

    -- Posted by Knoblickian on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 9:27 PM
  • Oh to have been a teenager in the 80's. Like Shapley, I was a drunken sailor and am still trying to fit that mold.

    -- Posted by Knoblickian on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 9:27 PM
  • Sorry bout the double post. I'm drunk, you know.

    -- Posted by Knoblickian on Thu, Oct 21, 2010, at 9:28 PM
  • I enjoyed a lot of the tunes of the '60s and '70s never knowing that so many were political. I just liked the sounds. Some of the music of that age, I didn't discover until 20 years later.

    Sam Cook did a good job with "Workin on a chain gain" but he did some better stuff that wasn't played much until they found him dead in his hotel room.

    "Jackie Blue" is still recognized but the Ozark Mountain Daredevils did "You Made It Right" and some other really neat stuff.

    Yeah, that part of the '80s was good and the leisure suit was long forgotten by then.

    -- Posted by Old John on Fri, Oct 22, 2010, at 11:07 AM

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